Episode Transcript
Brent Warner
The DIESOL podcast, Digital Integration in English as a Second or Other Language,

Ixchell Reyes
Episode 43. Summer of SAMR.

Brent Warner
Welcome to DIESOL. This is Episode 43. We are your hosts I am Brent Warner.

Ixchell Reyes
And I’m Ixchell Reyes

Brent Warner
Are you still eating right now?

Ixchell Reyes
Chomping on some cucumbers right before this. Yeah. Pretty good. I just got back from visiting California for a very short but lovely to the wild three day weekend because it was Memorial Day. And it is we’re into June by the time everyone’s listening to this episode, right? Yeah, so we’re heading into summer? That’s right. How about you? Are you all wrapped up with finals grading?

Brent Warner
Oh my god, no. So the way our semester works is like the the summer school starts immediately after. Immediately after the spring semester ends. So you still are grading by the time summer school starts. And it’s, it was a little bit of a wonky week one for summer. But my students are great. And it’ll will be good quite soon. So that’s OK.

Ixchell Reyes
And are you still teaching -are you still distance teaching?

Brent Warner
Yes. So we’re teaching online still, in the fall, we’ll be trying a little bit of hybrid work where it’s like one day on one day off type of thing. We just really don’t know what students are actually going to do. Like students say they’re going to do one thing, but what they actually sign up for might be a little bit different than what they say they want to sign up for. So. So we’ll be testing it out. And we’ll be we’ll be seeing what happens there. So yeah.

Ixchell Reyes
I’m glad we’re having these kinds of conversations. Now, instead of “Oh, we are week 42 into distance teaching.”

Brent Warner
I mean, I’m fully Vaxxed. At this point, I’ve gone out – I actually went into a restaurant recently, inside of a restaurant with my first time I had to kind of rip off the band aid and just forced myself to do it, even though I wasn’t comfortable, really. But I was like, you know, I think there’s, you kind of have to balance yourself out and say like, hey, there’s got to be a point where you actually do re enter the world. And yeah, you know, the math says that I’m safe at this point. You know, I had COVID of course, and then I and now I’m fully backed. So in theory, you know, really low chances, but better chances of me getting hit by a car so and I’ve never been hit by a car. So

Ixchell Reyes
yeah, no good news, I think on on both our ends, and I’m looking to go, hopefully, I think we’re reintegrating by the end of July. So that’s going to happen soon for me. And yeah, but it’s it’s good to see people out and about and it’s it’s the same trying to form a new habit of not wearing the mask.

Brent Warner
I still do carry the mask around with me and I put it on my places. But yeah. Well, it’s good. It’s summer. You know, it’s a beautiful day out today. We’re kind of moving into summer and everything. And there’s gonna be some conferences, anything you’re attending, by the way any any conferences are going to,

Ixchell Reyes
you know, I’m still stuck in between being burnt out by all of this stuff out there. And I’m interested in a lot of stuff but I just have not followed through. You don’t register I have the juice. Yeah. So right now it’s like, you know what, let’s just play it by ear and if something really calls me then, but no, I actually don’t have anything I was thinking about in just applying to TESOL but right now I’m, I am burnt out.

Brent Warner
That’s fair.

Ixchell Reyes
How about you? Are you doing? I know you’re doing lots of workshops.

Brent Warner
Yeah, I’ve got things going on. There are some workshops, I guess I’m I’m presenting at ISTE. So that’s kind of cool. I Oh, I was also

Ixchell Reyes
Did you share your news? Yeah,

Brent Warner
Oh, we didn’t talk about this. I am now blogging for TESOL on EdTech in ESL. So that’s exciting. You can go check out the TESOL – the official TESOL blog, and you can go just look for my face with a giant beard and you can’t miss it

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, that article’s great. Yeah, actually, you and I are doing something. We’re guest speakers in one of our interviewee Weina Li’s class next week at Pepperdine, so we’ll be doing that for them. But I think that’s about it for now. Yeah, we might be doing – Oh, I think we’re also doing Ah TESOL Puerto Rico, PR.

Brent Warner
Oh, that’s right. Yeah. Forgot completely about that. TESOL Puerto Rico, there actually are quite a few things. Keep following us on Twitter. We’ll tell you if we’re gonna. We’ve got things coming up. There are quite a few things still coming. So with that all said, we decided, Ixchell, we’re going to talk a little bit about SAMR and get into understanding this model of technology use. So let’s jump right over to that. Summer of SAMR!

Ixchell Reyes
Summer of SAMR. Oh, so clever.

Brent Warner
Okay, so let’s talk a little bit about SAMR. First we, back in episodes 28 and 30. We talked about a couple of standards. So we talked about SD standards. And we talked about test tech standards from TESOL. And how we might apply those in the ESL setting. So today, we’re going to be talking about SAMR: s, a, m, r, which is not a standard, but it’s kind of a model or a framework. And you shall, what does SAMR mean?

Ixchell Reyes
So Samara stands for substitution, augmentation, modification and redefinition. There are four categories. And it’s a framework developed by Dr. RUBIN when the mentor in 2006. So what is that, like 15 years ago? And it’s a framework to show the effects of technology on teaching and learning. So I didn’t hear about that till probably, maybe 2013 2014.

Brent Warner
Yeah, that’s kind of when it had a little boom going on. Like a lot of people were talking about it back then. But I will say that in the tech world, for sure, in the cue and the SD world, and in the Twitter teacher world, it was a big, big conversation. You know, six years ago, seven years ago, something like that, in the ESL world, crickets for the most part. And, you know, we kind of talked about those types of things, because ESL is better, I think, now in the last year than ever has been, but has not traditionally embraced a lot of technology. And so, so the reason that we wanted to talk about it today was because now people are like, Oh, wait a second, the after the last year, they’re seeing, hey, I can use some of this technology, I can, you know, how am I thinking about these things? And so it was kind of a thought for us, even though it’s not necessarily the freshest conversation for, for a lot of techie type of people, for a lot of the people in the ESL world is like, Okay, let me, let me jump right into this and really understand how I’m implementing these things. So we thought we would talk about the four different kinds of steps. And I want to clarify that there are different uses for each step. And that one is not really better than the other because I think a problem with SAMR when we talk about these four different quadrants, right, so you say s, as you mentioned, substitution, augmentation, modification, redefinition. All of those are how you might use technology in the classroom or with your students. And they’re kind of they’re often talked about in terms of steps. So it’s like the first one is substitution, then augmentation, and then modification and then redefinition. But I think that that is misleading to a lot of people that your goal is always doing redefinition, when your goal should always be educating your students, and to doing the best way to get interaction and work out of your students. And then these are different possible areas that you might play around with it. So I built a little, I did a read reversion of the graph that they kind of tend to show and instead of putting it on a ladder, I put it on a quadrant and then there’s arrows pointing to each of them, we’ll put them in the show notes. So if you want to see kind of how I think about it, in terms of looking at Sam or not as a single, we’re in one or we’re in the other, but we are you can move around between different ones for different purposes.

Ixchell Reyes
Right. And, I mean, I’m particularly interested in talking about this cause if I don’t have a framework, when as a teacher, if I don’t have some kind of framework, I might be using a tool willy nilly, and then call it tech integration, right. And so we look to other authorities or other experts in the field to make sure that we’re properly using a tool and not misusing the students time simply for the sake of trying some technology out there. Which I think is the danger now. You know, in the last year, you know, using a tool and calling it Oh, online teaching course online learning. And also to know like now that we’re going back to the regular classroom, how are we going to how is our approach going to change? And what framework? Are we going to think about these tools? And where can they best if we if we need them work? How can we use them to help our students reach their goal? So to confirm what I thought there is an article by imana khalidi led a holiday sorry if I’m not, my Arabic is rusty from 2021. So it’s fresh from this year, in which they examined teachers beliefs on developing a digital pedagogical framework based on the SAMR model for undergraduate English language learning. So this was like kind of a goldmine of an article. It explains what SAMR is, but what they found in talking to these teachers of iels is that and I quote, unfortunately, no one of the teachers was able to provide a successful identification of the levels of the SAMR model or any other model, this result does not go in line with the TESOL technology standards, particularly standard one, which states that language teachers demonstrate knowledge and skills in basic technological concepts and optional competence meeting or exceeding TESOL technology standards for language learners in whatever situation they teach. Which is to say teachers don’t have a framework and are not familiar and I can’t can’t identify a framework. And then this article touched upon two other two or three other frameworks that I’d heard of two out of those three, but not that fourth one. And so that’s kind of an area where I feel II language teachers need to need to be well versed on so that we make the best decisions for our students.

Brent Warner
That’s right. That’s right. So so that kind of reinforces what we’re talking about, which is, you know, we still need to talk about this stuff, right? It’s even if it’s not, you know, in, in my mind, even though it’s not the newest thing, it’s not, it’s not about the new thing. It’s about what’s what’s working and what helps teachers grow. And so as we step into this conversation, we’ll get into a couple of articles and web resources that you can look at. But just to kind of clarify, as we’re stepping forward, I want to kind of give a brief overview of SAMR and today we’re only in our depth, we’re going to talk about essence a but I would just want to briefly clarify the four steps. And so are the four I just said steps are not the four level the four quadrants on all call it. So substitution, and we’re gonna use Google Docs In this brief one, right, because the tool is not a is not a level of SAMR, right? The tool is not a quadrant, the tool is just the tool and how you’re using it is where it fits into the SAMR model. So Google Docs when we’re talking about it as a substitution, shall we just say that’s typing, right? Just using using the word processor? So if you’re, if you’re saying, hey, the non tech version is writing a paper, write by hand, I guess. And the tech version is just going into Google Docs and typing it up. Right?

Ixchell Reyes
Right. So the technology is a direct substitution for a non technology tool, but the task isn’t changed. And that tool does not alter the way that that language learner is interacting with the task.

Brent Warner
That’s right. So then we have augmentation, and keeping Google Docs in mind, this will just be things that are enhancements to it. So it would be you know, turning on spellcheck turning on word count, having the grammar feature going on inside of there. So there are things that make it better, that the technology can make it better inside of there. But they’re still enhancements to things and they kind of separate s and a as kind of the enhancement area, whereas M and R become the total transition, you know, a bigger transformational change there. So, so that’s kind of a there. And then we move into m. Right? And shall this would be something like using the collaboration tools inside of Google Docs.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, I think one thing to note here is that you’re still using a technology to substitute a non technology to You’ve modified the task, but now you are facilitating some kind of collaboration. So there’s a lot more shared work that is happening. So it’s it’s the end and modification,

Brent Warner
right. And then finally, at the end, is our which is redefinition. This is where things get into the world where it’s like, hey, this could never have existed without technology. And so you’re looking at things like putting in multimedia embeds into your Google Docs, having out links to different resources on things that you’ve built inside of there, sharing them publicly, so that people can look at them, and maybe even turning on the option for people like just strangers out there in the world to comment on them. All of these things that you can do.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, so here, I think it’s worth noting that the task has been significantly redesigned. And as you said, it’s empowering language learners to create something that was not you couldn’t have thought of before. And that does, he said, connecting connecting a student to a to an actual global audience, which couldn’t have done without that tool. That’s right.

Brent Warner
So we’re gonna get into today or later, we’re going to get into sn a, so that we can kind of look at a few examples of them in the ESL world and how teachers can think about them. And then in the future, we’ll get into m&r. But there are a couple of articles. There’s not a lot on ESL and SAMR. But I wasn’t surprised to find one from tan when who does all sorts of cool stuff. So you shall I think, actually, I’ve been surprised. I didn’t find it. You found it. But that was a pretty good article and quite clear with with a couple of ideas.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, we’ll put it in the show notes from his empowering e LL. ‘s. blog, which I just think if, if you’re new to summer, and you need like the quick and dirty, but also with examples. That’s one to bookmark. So we’ll put it in the show notes.

Brent Warner
Yeah. And then

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, go ahead. We’re just so eager to talk about SAMR. I also wanted to include there’s, there’s an interview with the with Ruben planted Quinta Dora, on applying the summer model. And it’s kind of nice to put a face to the name to you know, the person who designed this model. So that will also be in the show notes.

Brent Warner
And then finally, I also found a page. That’s basically, I don’t know what the sources originally, it’s just inside of Google. It’s a Google site that someone built for SAMR for English. But it’s really cool, because it goes into ideas in terms of how each of the each of the the quadrants fits into given standards for basically for high school English courses. And so really like lots and lots of different examples for all sorts of different standards that they’re trying to achieve. And so I would definitely recommend going in and looking at there to kind of get your head around these things. Because one thing I will say shell that we were talking about in the pre show is, it’s easy to get your head into like is this S is this a is this m is this R, as compared to, okay, this is kind of an S A, or this is kind of an A m area, or this kind of an M r area, because it really does kind of go on ingredients, and it depends on the way you’re thinking about things. It’s not perfectly okay, I’m only doing this right, or I’m only doing that. And so I think it’s valuable, that you might say, Hey, I think this is an A and I go I’m really it’s kind of more of an M right. And then we and we can both be right about that in the conversation. And so it’s, it’s more of a guide to help you integrate well with purpose rather than to say like, Hey, I must be perfectly doing this otherwise I am failing as a teacher or some something like that, which you know, we tend to get picky on ourselves when we see that there are these models are these frameworks for us to kind of live up to and we had some good pre show conversation like where did what do you think about this and, and I think that’s really, those are continued to be good and valuable conversations to have.

Ixchell Reyes
Absolutely.

Brent Warner
Okay, so today we don’t have any, any new reviews we will do encourage and welcome you to leave us review on Apple podcasts or any other podcast place and of course we still are giving away the pins if you want to get one if you want some DIESOL swag for free. That’s all you got to do is go drop us a line inside of the inside of Apple podcasts. But we did find that were listed on a, on a on a list again, feedspot comm top 10 ESL podcasts, and we made the list, which is cool. And then also, we’re the only ones that are really like a teacher focused on the rest of them are like helping students or helping people who want to learn ESL or er to build their language skills. And this one is, we seem to be the only one that’s really like a teacher focused one. So that’s kind of exciting and nice to see. So we’ll leave a link to that in the show notes as well.

Ixchell Reyes
Okay, so let’s go ahead and take a look at what what as an AE looks like. So just as a reminder, is a tool is not any level of SAMR, a tool can accomplish these steps, depending on the goal of the activity. So for us in substitution, what it would look like in reading, it would be something like simply using a PDF. So now you’ve taken a digital version of whatever you are having students read. And it’s just digital. Yeah, just substituting

Brent Warner
let’s take one, one tiny step back to which is, I think one way to recognize this, as people always say, Well, okay, so as you know, it’s the no tech level. And it’s like, no, it is still the tech level. And so we’re really saying like, there’s nothing there’s a blank or what would you call it like a, an X level, which is just like, hey, the actual zero tech level would be writing on or having a printed out piece of paper, right. And then the S level is putting a PDF online, as you’re saying, right. Cool. So we did mention writing before, and S is pretty straightforward. So we’ll move through it fairly quickly. But we did mention writing before. So if you’re talking about Google Docs, it’s just typing, right? You’re just going in typing on the computer. That’s all the substitution level of writing is, it’s just that you’re using some level of technology to write. So that would be Google Docs.

Ixchell Reyes
And for listening, it would be something like listening to a YouTube lecture or a podcast episode.

Brent Warner
Right? And again, that might be that might even be to the level where you’re, you’re playing it in front of the class, right? So it’s, you know, instead of you talking to the class, you might just be playing the video or playing the audio. And then speaking, I like this one you show because your students brought it up to you saying like, hey, voice recorder, right in your phone. Yeah, so instead of speaking, standing in front of the class, and speaking, you might just record yourself talking into your phone at the lowest level, and then having that recording available and playing it again later.

Ixchell Reyes
Right. So moving on to augmentation. And again, this is a tech tool substitution, but with an enhancement, some kind of improvement to the experience of the activity. And reading that would look like reading, reading something, but also having a dictionary function within the text. So you know how you highlight a word and up pops the definition or pronunciation perhaps?

Brent Warner
That’s right. Yeah. And this is where things start to get a little foggy. I also think, you know, it’s not very far in but it’s like, Wait a second, hold on a second. How is that not modification? If you know, all of a sudden, you have a free dictionary popping up? It’s like, Well, I think it’s kind of low level just little changes. And so yeah, I like the idea. dictionary, spellcheck, pronunciation checks, little things like that, that are inside of there that make the reading a little easier. Enhance. Yeah, it’s enhanced, but it’s not it’s not a totally different experience, or it’s not really it’s not really making the students experience more buy in necessarily. So with that, we’ve got, oh, sorry, I said spellcheck, that’s actually a writing thing. So writing, if you’re talking about Google Docs, spellcheck would be something inside of their word count, the grammar checks, all of those types of things. So they’re just little ways that help enhance and make that writing experience maybe a little better, or maybe a little bit more successful for students. As they’re kind of stepping into the tools or, you know, in my case, I have a lot of students that are using these for the first time they’re like, Oh, that’s really helpful. This, this here is there as well. And I don’t have to go Hey, teacher, how do I spell this thing? When they see the little red squiggly line? They can just click on it and then go, Oh, you know, augmentation is spelled with a with an au, not just an ag or something like that.

Ixchell Reyes
Right. I have colleagues that are still like with word count. Oh, yeah. They’re like blown away that Oh, it also counts the characters and it also gives you a reading level. or reading skill and all sorts of cool tools,

Brent Warner
where you and your colleagues don’t know that there’s a word counter inside of the word processor.

Ixchell Reyes
And Google Docs.

Brent Warner
Oh, I guess it’s kind of hidden. It’s up there on the bottom bar. So

Ixchell Reyes
yeah, no, it’s not. It’s Yeah, you have to go through a little. But But when you discover it, it’s like, yes, you know, I don’t have to stick to Microsoft Word. So it’s kind of like, like a hidden little surprise there. for listening, this would be something like listening, or watching a video with the captions on. And maybe perhaps you can change the speed of what, what you’re listening to slow it down or speed it up.

Brent Warner
Yeah, absolutely. I, that’s a big one that I like to show to my students speed is like slowing down a podcast down. And they’re like, Oh,

Ixchell Reyes
yeah. And I know that Netflix, recently added, well, within the last year added that function, it wasn’t always there, really. But yeah, one of my students, yeah, one of my students in Colombia told me and I was like, what, I don’t use Netflix in my classroom, but you know, they do outside of the classroom. And then of course, YouTube does have that. And sometimes students don’t know that you can speed something up and slow it down. And I, it’s in the little tiny, hidden corner of your video, there’s usually a little settings tool, or a gear tool, settings icon. And you can slow it down and speed it up.

Brent Warner
Yeah, that’s great. So then you might look at something like speaking, right. And if you’re recording on your phone as the kind of the substitution, I would say that the augmentation might be like, the next level is voice voice recording on an online platform, right? So that you can actually easily share it. The problem potentially, with recording on your phone is, okay, I’m Android on my phone, here’s the format that it’s going to put it out on how do I share that with my teacher and all of those things. And so now it’s like, okay, we all have a, we’re doing the same thing. We’re recording ourselves, but it’s kind of uniformed, it’s kind of easy to do get a quick link, and make that accessible. So that might be a slightly improved version of augmentation. And so so those are some things to think about. Now, you shall, before we kind of close up this little section here, I want to kind of clarify, we’re just giving some examples, right. And so I don’t want anyone listening to go, Okay, well, substitution and reading equals reading a PDF, right? That’s all it is. It’s like, Well,

Ixchell Reyes
yeah, that’s just one exam,

Brent Warner
right? It’s meant to be like, yeah, meant to be a potential example. And there are lots of different ways. And as we mentioned before, any tool might be anywhere on that spectrum, right, depending on the ways that you’re using it, and what parts of it you’re implementing, and all of those things. And so, some tools could only be substitution and some tools, you know, my my only and

Ixchell Reyes
all three,

Brent Warner
right? For some of them could be all four. And some of them might only like might really shine in the, you know, in the redefinition phase, but it’s like, well, why bother even using it for the substitution phase, right? So there’s lots of ways to kind of approach or to understand how these are fitting in or how these are serving your students. But you just want to recognize that all of these are potentially great for your students, right? substitution can be excellent, because, hey, we just want to read something. Here it is, here’s the PDF, let’s just read it, right? That’s totally okay. And, and encouraged, because reading isn’t a huge and important skill at the very basic levels of it, right. And it’s also encouraged to interact with things, it’s also encouraged to build things more. And so in the future, in the summer of SAMR, we will also be talking about M and R. And we’ll be doing a bit more of a deep dive into those because those are kind of the transformational levels. But, you know, all of this information is out there and available. We’re just trying to hope to focus it in for, you know, the TESOL world and people who are working with language learners a little bit.

Ixchell Reyes
Okay, so it is time for our fun find. This time around. I’ve been listening to a lot of music, new music, I’m not a Spotify person, but one of my friends. She only does Spotify. So I did find that you can get a lot of good suggestions on there. And you can make shared playlists and have like a, you know, you can share your music and you can listen to the same playlist at the same time. So that’s kind of cool, but that’s not my fun. Find my fun. Find is PAZ P-a-z. But I’m telling you that it’s she you can find her on Spotify because we couldn’t find as much as many of her songs on Apple Music.

Brent Warner
You’re talking about PAZ, not your friend who has a subscription to Spotify.

Ixchell Reyes
She has no subscription to Spotify.

Brent Warner
PAZ? Wait, who are you talking about your friend? Is PAZ a musician? What do you mean?

Ixchell Reyes
PAZ the musician. I was getting there. Okay. Okay. in a roundabout long winded… So no, so no, I was getting to my friend introduced me to Spotify and introduced me to PAZ. And she sings a lot of very calming music. And maybe some of you know that I am a night owl, and I struggle with sleeping. And this is a great way to wind down your evenings or when you want to, if you’re if it’s been a high energy day, this is a really good way to just play it in the background. So I didn’t know she was – PAZ was really big in the meditation meditation world. But I can see why. But her name is PAZ.

Brent Warner
Cool. I want to check that out. So we both went for kind of music related choices you went directly for an artist. I went for loudermilk, which is actually a TV show written by one of the Farrelly brothers and starring Ron Livingston, who was if you remember office space, he was the main character in office space. But anyways, it’s a it’s a television show. It’s a little bit brash, in certain points, but it’s it’s pretty funny. It’s basically about you know, it’s about recoverers. So addicts, and they’re kind of addicts together. But the the main character is an ex music critic. And so if you grew up in you know, in the music world, he and you’re in kind of around our age, roughly. So he’s like, talking all about these, you know, these these great bands and albums and things like that, at the same time as kind of, he’s now no longer really part of that world, which I associate with a lot. When I was younger it was all the music, and now I’m like, I love it. But I don’t really know what’s going on nowadays very much. And so it’s a it’s a fun show. It’s, you know, a well intentioned if a little, a little rough around the edges sometime. And so it’s I think it’s available on I want to say amazon prime. So Loudermilk there’s three seasons, I’m one season in, and I’ve been having some fun with it. So check it out.

Ixchell Reyes
Thank you so much for listening to the show, you could win a one of a kind DIESOL pin by leaving us a review on Apple podcast. We’re hoping that we’ll get one soon. But if you’re giving us a shout out any other way, please tag us on social media.

Brent Warner
That’s right. We’re on Patreon at the $1 $3 and $6 level. We should put some stuff up on there for people so that’s okay. So Patreon is there if you want to support the show just for supporting it sake. If not, you are we love having you. Listen, we have paused a little bit on clubhouse. So we’ve been doing it we did it for a while. We liked it but we’re we’re just kind of both at the end of our rope. It’s just like it’s more time sitting in front of the computer screen and more time kind of prepping for those screens. Yeah, I mean so many screens. You know, it’s like hard for a techie to go. We could go for some less screen time. But yeah, so we we will go back to it. Or we’ll go back to that probably in the future maybe give us another month or so. We might just throw in some random ones some non timed ones. So either you shall either you could run run one if you want to or I could run it or maybe we both are available at the same time. And we just do something random but we’re taking a temporary potentially high hiatus on the regularly scheduled clubhouses, but I think we’ll be back I think we’ll be sharing more again in the future.

Ixchell Reyes
For the show notes and other episodes, check out DIESOL.org/43. Or you can also listen at voicEd.ca or you can find us on Twitter. You can find the show at @DIESOLpod. You can find me, Ixchell, @Ixy_Pixy that’s I x y underscore p i x y.

Brent Warner
And you can find me at @BrentGWarner

Brent Warner
In Yiddish. Thank you is adank. So, adank for tuning in to the DIESOL podcast everybody.

The 2020 Pandemic forced many English Language Teachers to use digital tools to facilitate the delivery of content. However, what kind of framework exists to make sure we aren’t using at tool simply because it’s popular but because it can help us enhance the learning experience for the student? The SAMR model is still relatively unrecognized by many in the ESOL field. Our summer series focuses on breaking SAMR into examples for better understanding and application. Join Brent and Ixchell to discuss the first two levels of SAMR, Substitution and Augmentation.

Research

Standards Episodes

SAMR Model & Examples

SAMR shouldn’t be thought of as a ladder, but as quadrants you can jump across as needed.

S- Substitution

  • Reading
    • Reading a PDF
  • Writing 
    • Google Docs – Just typing
  • Listening
    • Listening to a YouTube Lecture or Podcast
  • Speaking
    • Voice Recorder to Phone

A- Augmentation (Tech Tool Substitution but with Enhancement)

  • Reading
    • Reading with a dictionary function within the text (pronunciation / definition)
  • Writing
    • Google Docs with Spell Check turned on (word count, etc.)
  • Listening
    • Listening with the captions on or a speed changes
  • Speaking
    • Voice Recording platforms online with links

Fun Finds

Ixchell – PAZ Music
Brent – Loudermilk

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