Episode Transcript
Ixchell Reyes
The DIESOL podcast

Brent Warner
Digital Integration English as a Second or Other Language

Ixchell Reyes
Episode 51 language learning on the go

Brent Warner
Welcome to DIESOL! This is Episode 51. We are your hosts I’m Brent Warner.

Ixchell Reyes
And I’m Ixchell Reyes.

Brent Warner
Fighting the ghosts for Halloween.

Ixchell Reyes
This is our second take my Wi Fi crashed in the middle of Brent talking about Shrunken Heads.

Brent Warner
Yeah! Halloween is coming and I am going to watch.. do the challenge – the 31 nights of Halloween where you watch a scary or Halloween themed movie. And so one of those movies is going to be Shrunken Heads recommended by our very own Ixchell Reyes.

Ixchell Reyes
(Laughter)

Brent Warner
Which I have to say like I looked it up I’m like this does not seem like a movie that you would be interested in. Because you never know my pop culture references and then it’s like, like 1991 movie made straight to video.

Ixchell Reyes
It’s got great graphics, okay. Leave it alone. Wait, I have a question.

Brent Warner
Yeah?

Ixchell Reyes
What happens if you run across a terrible movie? Do you actually watch it all the way?

Brent Warner
Oh, pretty much. Uh, it depends on the genre of movie but I sometimes cut movies off if I’m really not feeling it.

Ixchell Reyes
But you know, Halloween ones? For the 31 days?

Brent Warner
Halloween ones, I usually kind of do a little bit of pre vetting on them to see you. So all usually watch them all the way through.

Ixchell Reyes
So it’s not 31 wasted hours of bad Halloween movies,

Brent Warner
Excuse me movies are an hour and a half to 2. It’ll be at least 50 to 60 hours wasted.

Ixchell Reyes
(Laughter) Yes, this is true. Yeah. Okay,

Brent Warner
We’ll see, I don’t know. It’s, it’s just a way to take your brain off of things which we should all do. And you know, it’s Halloween, it’s the best season we are looking forward to everything so. But today, we’re talking about mobile apps learning on the go language learning on the go. So let’s jump over and get started into it. Alright, so Ixchell we wanted to talk about this idea, we just thought you know, it might be time to kind of just get into some apps and maybe talk a little bit about them and help our students learn a little bit about the things that they’re holding in their hands. And so we were able to grab some research, research is still fairly limited. And I think the the mobile app language learning. industry needs some development, even still, but we’ll we’ll take a look at this. So one of the one of the pieces, the articles that I found called the use of mobile technology, and education by international students in United States universities, by by runner on a mastery was a little bit older. So this is a this is from 2013. And so we really have to take it with a grain of salt, if so to speak. But I thought it was kind of interesting, because they were talking about the numbers about students who are using mobile apps to help them with their language learning. And it said at that time, 41% roughly, responded that they’re currently using mobile apps and their English language learning. And 58. Almost 59% said that they are not currently using apps, which means that they had like, tried them out, but they didn’t really stick with them, and maybe had to use them in the past to get some information. Now, this sounds kind of familiar to me, because sometimes I talk to my students, they’re like, Oh, yeah, I had this thing once. And I just kind of stopped using it right? And so even if those numbers have changed over the years, right, that, you know, 41%, who are using something and 58% are saying that they’re not. I still think that that’s telling it’s it’s it’s super interesting to see whether students are actively using their phones for language learning or just for their regular daily life.

Ixchell Reyes
Another article by Shawn lowen at all, called mobile assisted language learning a Duolingo case study. This is a newer article. It’s from 2019. This one, a couple of things worth mentioning that they made a point to say that research into the effectiveness of more, which is mobile assisted language learning for ultra development has been limited, just as you said. And that’s because of an absence of objective quantifiable measures of learning outcomes and all of the studies. And what they found is that the effectiveness of commercial online language learning programs is unclear. And often commissioned research by programs like Rosetta Stone, Duolingo, or Babel, have found favorable learning language learning outcomes for users. However,

Brent Warner
we paid for this research. Yeah. What are you gonna say about us?

Ixchell Reyes
Selita claims that they offer equal or greater effectiveness than face to face foreign language courses, which I think I mean, with the pandemic, we know that that’s probably not true.

Brent Warner
Yeah, I mean, we talked about some of that in the last episode, actually. So I think that’s it’s it’s interesting, it’s certainly worth looking at. And speaking of Duolingo, I also grabbed another one that was inside of that same inside of that same article, you know, that this was actually a research on Duolingo. But it was not commissioned by Duolingo. Right? This was a proper research article. So what they had found was kind of tied into this, which is that they said, pedagogic shortcomings such as a primary reliance on decontextualized, grammar, translation exercises, and audio lingual drills are surmountable. They’re saying, hey, these organs, these apps, like Duolingo can get past these things. If the app developers consider second language acquisition theory and research, for example, incorporating more meaning focused or tax task based activities where the learners are engaged in language beyond the individual sentence level, and that would be appropriate. And I thought that was really, you know, that’s a good claim. I think that makes sense. And that’s something we want to think about when we’re looking at apps and kind of understanding them. There was another quote inside of that article from hyphen Chapelle in the book, The Routledge Handbook of second language acquisition. And they made this overall claim that the need exists to better understand the new conditions for second language acquisition brought about by the real language related capabilities of technologies that many language learners have access to on a daily basis. So I still really love this idea of all the potential of mobile learning and the things that people can do. I mean, I remember like when I was living in Japan, and I would get on the bus, and I had to go 20 minute bus ride, and it’s like, well, I mean, of course, I was listening to podcasts and things like that, but it’s like, that’s a really good time to listen to some, some learning, like to get some or to be on the phone, and to be practicing some things, because it’s just kind of that downtime, that I always think of, as, you know, a good opportunity just to kind of keep your brain fresh and refreshed on on what you’re looking at. Right. So there’s a few things in there, we’re going to take a look at how this affects, you know, not how it affects how we can look at some of these apps that maybe can help out with an understanding that, you know, we’re not totally sure on everything in the full research base. But what we are kind of in the middle of that time zone of like, things are still being explored and understood and tested and, and that’s the kind of a good way to approach them.

Ixchell Reyes
As always, we’d love your support for this show. If you want to take some time to support us with 30 seconds of your time and iTunes review does wonders, and we haven’t had one in a while you could get a free pin.

Brent Warner
Yeah, I can almost guarantee you’re gonna if you want a pin, if you want the DIESOL pin, yeah, I guarantee you’re gonna get one if you leave us or you

Ixchell Reyes
know, if you’d rather support us by loosening the drawstrings on the old coin pouch. We have a Patreon and a buy me a coffee.

Brent Warner
Awesome. And of course, as always, if you just want to keep on listening, and if you find the show itself, just a good time to listen. That is totally great, too. So tools. All right. So Ixchell we’re going to talk about some of the things that you can use on your phone with the kind of caveats that we put in the beginning, but you know, what can we actually look at here? What can we understand what can we use to help our students and what can we show to our students to get them going and have them practice some language?

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, some of these we’ve talked about briefly when we we’ve looked at apps to cover a specific course. skills. So some of these might overlap. The British Council learn English is has several apps actually. But it’s great because you’ve got a video series you’ve got a story zone, you’ve got magazines, etc And so these are all curated materials that are aligned to well you know, they’re British English certification levels so you’re going to get that but they’re you’re looking at it through there’s some kind of baseline there. So this is one that comes up often my students use it use a lot of the British Council learn English apps, and this is one of them.

Brent Warner
Cool. Yeah. And so speaking of you know, I think I think England is a lot better at providing services for English language

Ixchell Reyes
learners stuff is really good. Very Yeah, it’s organized it looks the layouts are really professional there and so I mean even in navigating it myself as a teacher to sometimes find something it’s it’s it’s not a messy website, it’s not a messy app. It’s It’s It’s all there. It’s clean.

Brent Warner
Yeah, well, and that’s, that’s why I kind of wanted to tie it to also another one that does a good job is a BBC learning English. And so I think you’ve used this specifically in class with your students, but it has all sorts of cool stuff inside of it. So it’s got like diagnostic tests. It has grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation skills, business, English, etc. And then it’s pretty cool because you can break it down by different programs. So I’m looking at it right now. And it’s got like, daily practice, and it says everyday English, Business English, learn with the news, learn with drama, and so you can go tap on those, and then you can kind of connect into what your, your own goals are for learning there. And so I think that’s a really, you know, I just, I just love that the BBC offers things like this, right? And it makes it accessible to language learners anywhere.

Ixchell Reyes
The fact that it’s categorized in a way that students might find it engaging, and not overwhelming is a big plus, because I think this is one of the reasons why students keep coming back to these apps or don’t delete them off their phones, you know, if they’re, you know, my students have told me Well, I’m gonna watch a video I’ll go to the BBC learning English or you know, the app, also the one minute English and etc. But it’s just a quick, easy way for them to get some practice.

Brent Warner
Yeah. And also just gonna throw in there as a little extra tip, if you use the BBC learning English app, there’s a section down there at the bottom, it says English for teachers, and it gives a couple of, you know, like, tips. And, you know, things to do, like using intonation, or how to give instructions are a few things like that. And so I hope they continue to grow that section as well, because that’s a cool. Okay, so next up is memorize, memorize. So we’re going to be talking about a few apps that are kind of similar to, you know, like, maybe overlap a little bit here. So memorize is it gives you short video clips, that help you check comprehension, and then it’s kind of conversational in nature there. So this one has been pretty popular for a little while. There’s lots of different things, you can watch these videos, and then kind of listen to these phrases that people talk about. And then, of course, like these days, that has like some gamification stuff, and, you know, like all these different options inside of it. And so, I have seen a lot of people recommending or talking about memorize, and I know that it’s built for multiple different languages. So if you are out there, if you if you’re a language teacher, and you’re wanting to have a little bit of a better feeling of what your students are going through, you could use this as a teacher. But you can also share this with your students because there is an English version inside of there as well, right. And most

Ixchell Reyes
of their stuff is like for your beginning to intermediate students who might need that support and repetition. Because you’ll you’ll have like a little video clip, and then you can replay it, and it’s just a little segment of conversational English that they might need to review. Cool. So adding to the list is knowable. That’s what the K has no knowledge. And this is a pretty cool app, you have short videos, different categories. So it could be business, it could be technology, there are about 10 minute pieces, psychology, and then you’ve got the transcript. But you’ve also got note outlines which I think is really cool, especially if you’re teaching students how to outline and they need examples of something you can actually look at the outline of that particular video. The audio is also select. They’re all these are all real pieces. So they’re not someone didn’t record them. They’re just real pieces from the internet. But they’re all they’ve been selected. So The audio is at a good pace for a language learner. The app is free to a degree, I think if you want that if you want to have access to the entire library, there’s a subscription fee, but it’s a pretty good app. And right now I think to get on the to sign up where you have, someone’s got to allow you in. So there’s a waitlist, sort of like with when we were doing clubhouse where someone’s got to allow you in. But it’s the selection of videos and content that’s free is really good.

Brent Warner
So I’m looking at this Ixchell, just right now on the website. And like, it looks like it’s not totally about language learning. This is about learning skills or learning learning. So it could be for anybody, but you’re saying for anybody? Yeah. So it’s like, hey, here, I want to learn how to be more creative or negotiate or, you know, do public thinking or something like that, or public public thinking public speaking?

Ixchell Reyes
Public thinking – Please, no! No more public thinking

Brent Warner
Yeah, we really don’t need that anymore. So so that’s cool. So it’s also this is something that I really like to because it’s, they have the opportunity to practice language through authentic materials, right? Yeah. And this is something I like about

Ixchell Reyes
This is for students who are trying to boost their academic English skills. And they’re beyond that intermediate stage. But now maybe can’t go out there and surf the web completely, you know, look at everything, because it’s too overwhelming. This is a good place to start branching out. And then, oh, I like this speaker. Let me look up some TED Talks by them outside of the app, this would be like a really good bridge.

Brent Warner
Cool. Cool. Yeah, I like that. Because, you know, I think a lot of what we’re talking about is specifically language built. But I like the idea. And I always want to share things with students that are not actually the language, but it’s just an opportunity to be involved with something using English. So that’s great.

Ixchell Reyes
And so long the same genre of these apps, there’s a what picker app, which Luna, which who we interviewed on the show, she shared this one with us. It’s again, it’s an app that curates videos and shows for native for native speakers. So you’re looking at real television shows, or a speech or a commercial, and it’s got the Immersive Reader built in. So you can actually look at the script, and you can have it be read back to you slower. And it also has the built in translator, which is really neat, because now you can you know, tap on the word immediately from there. You don’t have to switch to another app to go look at it. It’s all within the app. And I think you mentioned an alternative to this that I hadn’t heard of. And that’s lingo pi.

Brent Warner
Yeah, lingo, pi is similar type of thing. It’s been showing up on my thing on my Instagram feed. And so there must be I must have been looking at one of the similar types of apps in

Ixchell Reyes
public speaking this.

Brent Warner
As we all know, the phone has been listening to us for the last several years. And so it’s like you need lingo pie. I don’t know about the name, but we’re talking about public thinking so. So anyways, yeah, it’s a similar type of thing there where you get the videos, you kind of have a chance to like tap on words, I think they’re like subtitles, and you can tap on the individual words as the subtitles come up, and then it’ll define it for you and those types of things. So, so that might be an option for people as well. I wanted to go back to something classic, but that’s still just like, it’s such a mind blowing tool, which is Google lens. You’ve used this in the past radio show.

Ixchell Reyes
I have not used earlens. Okay, no, so I didn’t know it. Just it really. Yeah,

Brent Warner
I think they like bought it from another company, like a bunch of years ago. But basically, the idea was with Google lens, you would just open up your phone and hover your camera over some text right in it in a foreign language, and it will translate it into your language and see,

Ixchell Reyes
well, I use the Google Translate app that way but is that that’s a this is a separate thing now from the Google Translate, right?

Brent Warner
Yeah, they’ve kind of blended it together. So Google lense now is a full like AI suite of things like you can point it at a flower and they’ll tell you what kind of flower it is, right? So it’s got all these different parts parts to it, but but the stuff that we can use for language learners still, I still think that translation thing is just incredibly powerful, especially if you’re talking like you know lower language students, and they’re trying to get their English going, and they just need some help like they’re walking across campus and they don’t understand which building to go to right. Like just being able to hold up The phone and scan it and go, Oh, I need to go to Student Services, right? That makes sense to me now, like, they could kind of get there with some of those things. But you can do it for bigger level points. But another one inside of Google lens too, is you can take a picture of text, and then you can copy it in Google lense, then go to your computer in a Google Doc, and you can paste that text directly in. So it connects the accounts. And so it’s like I was looking at this sign, click OK, it’s going to drag in, it’s going to convert it all to text, and then it’s going to paste it into a Google Doc for me. So then I can like slow down and look at the language and manipulate it and you know, look up words, or whatever it is inside of inside of the Google Docs later, after you’ve kind of been on the go. And you can also of course, look in the Google Docs on your phone. But I love that idea of like, Hey, here’s some stuff I want to kind of figure this out. And I do this with my students sometimes. So I’ll be like, go find grammar in the wild, right? Go find this, you know, take a picture of finding some of use of these, these prepositions or whatever it is, right. And so I like this idea that they could kind of collect that and put them all into maybe like a shared doc or something like that, as well. And then I know, you saw I was mentioning this briefly to you in the pre show, and you said, iOS 15 we’re very, very modern.

Ixchell Reyes
So if you haven’t downloaded, download it, update, it’s worth it.

Brent Warner
So iOS 15 How does this work in iOS 15. Now,

Ixchell Reyes
whatever it is, you’re taking a picture of, or using what even like, if you take in a screenshot, there’s a little icon in the lower right corner, when you click the icon, it’ll either ask you whether you want to copy the text if it reads text within the image, or whether and then or whether you want to share that with any other apps or open it in a specific document. So it’s sort of like what Google lens is doing. I just think just in its own Apple way.

Brent Warner
Yeah. So whichever side of things you’re on, or whatever, whatever type of phone you’re using, you can get access to this type of technology which is just so powerful. Geez, I remember I remember like when I was in college, I had a scanner and I would like scan these documents. And like the OCR stuff, like it was it was so hard to get the optical character recognition and like it would miss half of the words and like it didn’t understand those things. And now it’s just like snap a picture and it automatically shows up it’s so cool. So So those are a few of the ones so we also want to talk about this i think you know, we have to look at these some of these are free some of them costs like as you get into membership levels and different things but I do want to point out that when you’re sharing these apps with your students or when you’re looking at them for yourself, always go in and check the the the do that do the free trial because a lot of times after that free trial, they will give you like a massive discount like I’ve seen it sometimes where it’s like okay, this thing’s $100 for a year and then you do the free trial and you’re like no I’m not gonna get it and they’re like Are you sure? What if it was $8 for the year I’ve seen things like that they’re extreme differences so they just tried to like pull you in and then they like they keep dropping and figuring out different ways. I don’t know how much you can play the system or whatever you can go look that up but it’s worth knowing about so so there are some other ones out there and I’m not saying that every one of these does that perfectly you’re gonna have to go and do your own research but we were talking briefly about drops by Kahoot you, Ixchell, you said you use it you used this

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, I did not know that drops had been acquired by Kahoot I use drops myself for Arabic. So when I was trying to expand my Arabic vocabulary I I had that app and now apparently it’s you know, it looks a lot nicer and slicker and of course, with a little bit of Kahoot flavoring to it. But yeah, it’s a pretty good vocabulary expansion tool. Yeah.

Brent Warner
So so if you kind of like that style, and you know, that’s gonna be clean and easy to follow gamified Yeah, so that’s pretty cool. And then I, this was one of the ones that I saw inside the reviews, they said, Hey, once you sign up their sales that come through pretty regularly, so just hold off, like do the free version, and it gives you five or 10 minutes a day, which might be plenty for some people. And then and then if you want to upgrade, if you think it’s worth it, you can also probably get some sales on that. Another one that I thought of, for my students, we’ve talked about it quite a few times Newsela the tiered readers, right? So I like the idea of Newsela because it’s reading authentic news, right? And so Students themselves can choose the levels it’s a pretty good display on the phone like it’s easy to read straightforward. So I think there’s a lot of choices there for Newsela as well.

Ixchell Reyes
So now there’s also several podcasts and of course podcasts are our favorite so Brent you collected quite a few

Brent Warner
Yeah, I collected a handful and these ones I want to be clear these ones are one of our podcasts that are specifically for English language learners, right so same conversation as before, I love giving authentic materials saying hey, go out there and listen to this American life or you know, planet money or whatever it is because those are truly authentic and real language use. But I also think depending on the students and how much time they have available, those customized podcasts that are really for English language learners and for specific skills maybe these can be really helpful so one that I found was called… Culips sorry culips, c-u-l-i-p-s and I thought it was pretty cool because it has a bunch of easy to understand English with this wide variety of sub shows. I don’t know how to describe it, but like this episode is about accents. And this series of episodes is about accents and this series is about simplified speech or real conversation. And so I don’t know how often it is I think they have like 600 different episodes or something but you know, maybe on a Monday one week is the accents show and then on Thursday is the real conversations show and so they rotate them through so you have lots of different goals for for listening if you want to focus in on a specific type of English Another one is a six minute English from BBC and I and you saw Did you say that you use this one as well?

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, I think it’s in there. Well, I could be wrong. I think that there’s also different there’s a one minute in English and that three minute English I don’t know. I feel like I’ve heard it but I could be wrong.

Brent Warner
Yeah, there’s there’s all sorts of different things. But the reason that I like six minute English and I don’t know if there’s a three minute English or not, but but I do like this because there’s nothing tucked away or there’s nothing again, it’s BBC they’re just like, here’s everything for you. You don’t have to sign into anything. You don’t have to get a membership to anything. It’s just like, here’s the page. Here’s the you can listen to it right here you can you can listen to the vote, you can check the vocabulary, you can get the questions, you can get a full transcript, there’s it’s like, very straightforward and really easily accessible for everything. So that’s what I really, you know, because I have students that say, Well, I want to listen to this podcast, but does it have a transcript? Does it have transcription? Well, you know, there’s no like law out there saying that podcasters need to make transcriptions. The DIESOL podcast does make transcriptions available to you at DIESOL.org

Ixchell Reyes
We do have language learners who listen us.

Brent Warner
We do. And so… but I like the the BBC provides that and doesn’t you know, some of these ones, I think Culips does this, too, is like they say, hey, here, you know, pay for the premium version, which of course, they’re doing great, you know, work. And so I’m totally like, I support that, but also with BBC a little simpler, but also like that, that information is right there. And one last one, Ixchell I don’t know if you’ve heard all ears English.

Ixchell Reyes
No, this is new to me.

Brent Warner
So this is a, it’s pretty in depth. Like it’s I was like, Oh my god, what does the show, they get lots of different topics, all sorts of things. And what I kind of like about this show, is that it, it feels to me like the break off lessons that you always want to teach in class, right? You’re like, Oh, we can go into and talk about 10 minutes about this side thing, or whatever it is. But you don’t always have time in class to do that, right? It’s just like this one focal point. And but then they get into it. So. So a recent example was they did an episode called How to use end up to talk about your past in English, right? Just just that, right? And it’s like, oh, yeah, I would. And as I looked at it, it’s like, 15 minutes long. And I’m like, that you would totally could talk about the different parts of that. And you could give examples, and you could, you know, like, I could absolutely see it. But I would also be like, I don’t have time to give 15 minutes to end up in my class on a race. Right? And so I could assign it Yeah, you could assign it exactly. Here it is. Check this out. This is this is a valuable resource for you and so so all ears English, and it’s an incredibly popular podcast. You know, it’s it’s hugely downloaded, and it seems well funded. I do not know where they get their money, but it seems like they’ve got full time jobs doing this podcast stuff, so I’ll have to check it out. Yeah, it’s It’s pretty robust

Ixchell Reyes
and we have some honorable mentions these are a couple of apps that we keep coming back to and we’ve mentioned in several of our episodes one of them is Quizlet which you know it’s been around for I actually don’t know how long but it’s got to be over 10 years seems like it yeah cuz I remember using it when it was not there was flashcards calm or something and then those merged and then your account got migrated but anyway Quizlet is just that for me when I think of accessibility to students Yes, it’s it’s pretty robust in the sense that you can make your own customized word lists or fact lists or whatever it is you you’re needing to study. But there are students who don’t have time to do that because they may be doing something at a rapid pace or they’ve got jobs etc. And there’s a lot of stuff out there that’s just available already curated, and it’s pretty good I mean, you do have to sift to make sure they’re all correct, but I was doing a training recently for work and there was a lot of technical vocabulary and I went to Quizlet and sure enough, a couple of people had posted some of the terms and the acronyms and again I didn’t have to create an account I didn’t have to do anything other than look it up so Quizlet is just awesome and then there’s vocab Victor vocab Victor is a game vocabulary game but it’s it’s got lots of different style, just different types of games to get you to engage and i’ve i’ve got students who use it often quite often and you move through levels and so it it there shorten up the games are short enough to keeps you competing against your score and yourself and you can now I think compete with your friends. And what I like about it is that during the pandemic, they added a lot more stuff to their teacher platform, because now you can have your own custom vocabulary lists and pre load them and see your students achievement and how they’re using it. So you could see through the through the teacher portal, which is pretty cool.

Brent Warner
Yeah. And Heidi has been a friend and supporter of the show, and she’s done a ton of work on there. So vocab Victor, we’ve talked about it a few times. Definitely worth checking out. So there’s tons of stuff he shot one thing I kind of struggled with with this episode is like, Are we going to cover the coolest newest stuff? Or are we going to find like whatever and and I hope that anybody out there listening? I mean we We always love so please share out with us. If you get on Twitter, if you get on Instagram and share with us, you know, what apps do we miss? Because I think there’s gonna be a ton of cool stuff that we don’t know about, that other people are using or sharing with their students, and especially if you’re asking your students what they’re using, and let us know so that we can continue spreading the word and helping people get some of that mobile learning going on.

Ixchell Reyes
All right, it is time for our fun finds. And today I have a book the book is called Sorry, I’m mad. It’s a poetry collection by Jude St. Jude and Jude is a Brazilian living in Italy, who speaks three or four languages. And he wrote this poetry collection in English. So I wanted to support language learner who or you know, the language speaker of several languages who now you know, to write poetry in another language and encapsulate you know, emotions and feelings that way is pretty amazing because I can’t even write poetry in English Haiku is as far as I go. And it might be like doremi faso

Brent Warner
Haikus, Ixchell. but can you can you write us recite one of your haikus right now for us?

Ixchell Reyes
No. I told you it’s do-re-mi-fa-so there you go five syllables.

Brent Warner
That’s not a whole haiku.

Ixchell Reyes
five-seven-five?

Brent Warner
Yeah,

Ixchell Reyes
I don’t remember

Brent Warner
Oh my gosh. Okay, so mine is a song by Shungudzo and the song is called It’s a Good Day to Fight the System. This I don’t know if you’ve heard this song It’s it’s making some of the rounds so it was in I heard it first in the the chair that that Netflix show with the Sandra Oh, but it’s just a killer song. It’s uplifting but it’s also like, you know power. It has got some some power ideas inside of it. But it kind of sounds like if you’re into I don’t know if you’re into like St. Paul & the Broken Bones or if you’re into like Alabama Shakes or maybe something along those lines. It kind of fits in with that kind of genre. But really great song worth putting into your rotation. It’s a good day to fight the system.

Ixchell Reyes
Thank you so much for listening to the show you could win a one of a kind diesel pen, as we said fine leaving us a review on Apple podcasts. And if you’re giving us a shout out any other way, be sure to tag us on social media we are on all the platform’s

Brent Warner
and of course you can find us on Patreon if you want to support the show. Or if you want to only support one time you can also do buy me a coffee all that stuff’s on the website at DIESOL.org and of course you can find the show notes including transcription for the episode at DIESOL.org/51 the number five one and you can listen to the show on voice Ed Canada voiced.ca. Of course we are on Twitter so you can find the show at DIESOLpod and you can find me at Brent G Warner.

Ixchell Reyes
You can find me Ixchell, @Ixy_Pixy that’s I x y underscore p i x y. In Hawaiian Thank you Is Mahalo, Mahalo for tuning in to the DIESOL podcast. Thanks, everybody.

There are myriad mobile apps for language learning, but how do we know which ones are effective? In this episode we revisit the use of mobile assisted language learning (MALL) and take a look at different applications students can use to support their language learning.

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