Episode Transcript
Ixchell Reyes
The DIESOL podcast

Brent Warner
Digital Integration in English as a Second or Other Language,

Ixchell Reyes
Episode 55: Exit Tickets

Brent Warner
Welcome to DIESOL! This is episode 55. We are your hosts I am Brent Warner

Ixchell Reyes
and I’m Ixchell Reyes. It is December

Brent Warner
December DIESOL DIESOL DIESOLmber?

Ixchell Reyes
Hey Brent, what’s up? How are you doing?

Brent Warner
Pretty good.

Ixchell Reyes
It’s getting cold here in Japan. How’s it going on? We’re in the West Coast.

Brent Warner
We’ve had these weird like heat, heat blasts. So it’s been like, it’s getting cold right now. But like we had, we had these, like, several days of like, weirdly hot times and all this different stuff. So it’s been, you know, there’s definitely not global warming happening on a massive scale.

Ixchell Reyes
Climate change. Climate change climate,

Brent Warner
Let’s call it climate change.

Ixchell Reyes
Because it cools down in other places. So it’s not just warming

Brent Warner
Right. Okay, sorry. I’ve gotta get caught up on my proper terminology, recently. We’re not supposed to call them mudslides. Did you learn – Did you know that?

Ixchell Reyes
What?

Brent Warner
Yeah, mudslides is a California expression. And we’re, yeah, we’re only supposed to say debris flow. That’s what we’re supposed to say for it.

Ixchell Reyes
Oh, we don’t want to offend a mudslide community?

Brent Warner
Well, a mudslide – yes, because the mudslide community is offended because that is a drink. It is not something that is destructive to the environment.

Ixchell Reyes
Depends on how many you drink! Get it? So your debris flow.

Brent Warner
Otherwise, everything going okay.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, everything’s going great. I mean, I can’t complain. I mean, the better was cold here. And you’d get up in the middle of the night to go take your midnight pee, and the toilet seat is so warm. You can’t complain. (laughter)

Brent Warner
Yep. No. I can complain about some stuff. You want to hear me complain about anything? What are you in the mood for? Can I complain about my air pods, which I in a previous episode said that I liked?

Ixchell Reyes
So wait a minute, wait a minute. Wait a minute. So you’re backtracking on those air pods? Yes, please explain. Please tell.

Brent Warner
Yeah, because they broke. And I have to throw them into the trash

Ixchell Reyes
How old are they?

Brent Warner
Like 15 months old, or 16 months old. And they just stopped working. And I took them into the place and the guy’s like, it would be cheaper for you to buy a new pair than it would be to fix them or replace them. And I’m like this this like $170 or something like that. Like it is not cheaper to replace them. So I asked him specifically I said if I throw them against the wall, is there any likelihood that they’ll get fixed? And the official Apple employee response is “I don’t think so.” So just (laughter)

Ixchell Reyes
So this means you immediately…

Went back to my good old wires!!

But wait a minute. How are you supposed to use those with your new phone?

Brent Warner
You know what? That’s a great question. The way that I did it is my wife upgrad- No, she gave me her old ones that because she has to still work so she gave me one with the with the proper attachment. But I’m also pretty upset about that because let me get on my Apple Rage.

Ixchell Reyes
so for those of you who don’t know, Brent just upgraded his phone after having had a what did you have? Like is there even a C?

Brent Warner
6S+

Ixchell Reyes
6S+, that’s like that’s like a five year old phone now.

Brent Warner
Yeah, I know. And I loved it and I’m so sad to say goodbye. But the problem with the the six The only problem with it was that the camera was starting to get a little bit loose and so so when I would hold up the camera, it was like getting shaky, like, like, visible shakiba see it? You can see it on the screen. And so anyways, my wife upgraded and so I took her old one and now I am 11 which is not you know, I mean, it’s still a couple years behind but from 620 11 I hate the knotch but anyways, you know that I complained about it all the time on Twitter how much the notch is just the worst thing in Apple’s design history

Ixchell Reyes
Just to be clear Just to be clear, you’re not going to be switching to Android anytime soon.

Brent Warner
So have you seen that that Google folding phone?

Ixchell Reyes
Yes.

Brent Warner
Kinda like maybe that’s like my next. Next lady is is the Apple is the Google folding. I mean, I’m just saying, like, we got to keep our options open, because, you know, Apple, I was realizing in the Apple Store that I have been with Apple stuff for since I was 16 years old. So like, twenty… twenty…. So, you know, a lot a lot of years.

Ixchell Reyes
Apple was around when you were 16?

Brent Warner
Yes, thank you. (laughter) But but not not like it is now. There was there was no such thing as Apple Stores like you would go in, you would literally go into someone’s basement to buy an Apple, right? Like I did this several times where it would be like, some, some guy working out of his garage or whatever, like you had to like, it was you had to know how to go get an apple. But then they were also super customizable back then. I mean, we’re talking about iOS eight, and iOS nine, like that was, you know, before the tan and the big change to all the, you know, the GE UI style of things. So the totally different world of Apple back then. But But yeah, you know, maybe it’s time, maybe Apple has not been treating me well. And maybe.

Ixchell Reyes
Well, as you know, in the last few years, I just think they’re not as innovative. I mean, the only thing that draws me is the camera. But that’s not like the only reason to get a phone so well. The phones have equally. Yeah, great cameras. So

Brent Warner
yeah, I was just gonna say like, I noticed, this is such a bummer. I was not excited about getting a new phone. And like, it used to be the case where it was like, you’re always excited. You’re like, Yes, I’m gonna get the new one and whatever.

Ixchell Reyes
Yep, that’s the same experience I had with my latest phone. I have the 12. And I actually hate it. I hate my phone.

Brent Warner
Hate!

Ixchell Reyes
Hey, I don’t like it.

Brent Warner
Have you seen the Google folding phone? (laughter)

Ixchell Reyes
All right, well, then with that

Brent Warner
Time to go into the show. It is time maybe we’re gonna maybe Apple will give us an exit ticket and let us know. Like we can let them know what our feelings are. Transition!

Exit ticket. Yes. Why are we talking about this?

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, so well, we covered Warm ups in Episode 43, I believe.

Brent Warner
No. 53.

Ixchell Reyes
53

Brent Warner
Only 2 episodes ago. Not like in the summer.

Ixchell Reyes
I tell you this time change. Yeah. So Episode 53, we covered warmups, because that’s, you know, one of the activities that sets off your lesson and oftentimes creates a point of reference for the students. But now we also need to close up a lesson we want to assess how much the students learned. We also want to see if we need to reteach and so we decided that it would be you know, we’re closing off the year with an episode on exit tickets.

Brent Warner
Yeah. That was also a popular episode, people seem to like it. got quite a few downloads on it. So. So we’re following up kind of the end, end, side, front side, and inside here, little, little mini duo, two part thing. And we wanted to talk a little bit about this, because I do think it’s valuable. And I don’t know about you, Ixchell, I don’t do exit tickets as much as I might or as I should. But I kind of was thinking about this too. And I’m like, Oh, this, you know, like, I I know, he should I know, it’s not necessarily that hard. But I haven’t just built it into my regular pattern of work right with my glasses.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, I agree. I think that you know, oftentimes what we just get stuck with other things that we’re planning or trying to implement or infuse our lessons with, especially for someone who’s always growing and trying out new things, exit tickets or something that I’ve known about. And here and there, I’ll remember, but I haven’t, I haven’t built this into something that’s a habit. Like for me, like I think it has to it’s a routine thing. And it’s got to be built in so that it becomes a habit.

Brent Warner
Yeah. And I think it I mean, as we get into it, we’ll talk about it’s really not very hard to do, like, there’s lots of different ways to do it. And so it’s it is like you’re saying it’s more just like a matter of building it in and getting used to it, rather than anything else because I’ve of course, I’ve done exit tickets. And I know you have to but it’s just like, like, are we doing it regularly? Are we are we kind of recognizing how valuable they can be so so let’s start off with the kind of an article that’s referenced a lot is this one by Marzano, which talks about the Ford kinds of exit ticket prompts. Now this is available, it’s a little confusing, but it’s available on ASCD. And we’ll have the link in the show notes here. But let’s just talk about these four different kinds of Ixchell. And if you have any thoughts on them, or any ideas, we can, we can kind of break it down a bit from there. So the first one is, so it’s, you know, it gets into like, Hey, what are exit tickets, of course, and the idea that like, at the end of class, you’re going to give students some sort of prompt and, and get some valuable information out of that. But I like how this one starts, because this is kind of the broadest one. And so we can look at the different types of prompts. And so the first one is, prompts that provide formative assessment data or data. So I think with that one, Ixchell, I mean, really, we’re just trying to see like, what are the students understand about the classroom materials?

Ixchell Reyes
Those would be with this would inform me on whether what you need to reteach? Or what they may have sort of grasped halfway. And also identify the students that that didn’t get it, or not able to articulate something.

Brent Warner
Right. And so this is, I think, this is kind of what most people think of when they think of their exit tickets. They’re like, Hey, can I want to do something? That’s a quick grammar check. And like, see, if you understand the basic grammar idea that we talked about, when maybe a simple sentence, a close exercise? What is the one word that you would use to, you know, to fill this grammar to make it proper? Correct? Or, you know, can you show me an example of a irregular verb or something like that, right? Pretty, could be pretty straightforward, could get in depth, of course, but one of the ideas about exit tickets is you’re trying to keep it light and trying to keep it quick, right? And so, so you might just choose one quick example of that. But yeah, formative I think it’s the most basic, the general one that people tend to go to. But I like that there are a number of other ones. And so the second one that Marzano points out here is prompts that stimulate student self analysis, prompts that stimulate student’s self analysis. And so this one might be kind of like a question like, How hard did you work today? Or, you know, do you feel

Ixchell Reyes
confident? Do you feel calm and confidence checking their confidence, because that this is probably my favorite type of exit ticket, I think I tend to gravitate toward this, because I’m so big on, you know, incorporating strategies that helps students be self reflective. And and sometimes this is it, this is the only chance they get to do a reflection. And it might be really short and quick, but it’s a habit again, you’re trying to help them to form a habit as well. Yeah. And then you can see, hey, I actually feel 80% confident now, or prepared for whatever it is, right? Or I don’t at all, I feel confused.

Brent Warner
Yeah. Yeah. So there’s all sorts of different ways that you could deal with that. And you could, you could see how the students are feeling about it. Both individually and collectively. So I think there’s a lot of real strength to that. And an opportunity to kind of see some of the things that like, I think a lot of us kind of look at students and see them nodding their heads. And we’re like, yeah, they were nodding their heads, they got it.

Ixchell Reyes
nodding their heads, cuz they’re confused. Yeah.

Brent Warner
Right. It could be all sorts of different things they might have. They might have working Arab air pods working in their ears, and they’re digging. is so salty, prompting prompts that focus on instructional strategies, prompts that focus on instructional strategies. So this one is kind of a little bit more for the value, I think of the teacher. But you know, you could see things like, you know, what did you think of this activity, right? We did we used today we use jam board, like how, you know, how was using jam board? Right? You could ask something like that? Or what are some things that you would like, that would have helped you to understand this material better, you know, something like that, right? So, so you could really do some, some things that are are trying to get to the students understanding of how the lesson was run, or maybe, you know, for us with tech, like, what tech was being used and how hard or easy it might have been to understand those things. So it’s right about the naked strategies.

Ixchell Reyes
Go ahead. Good, make adjustments based on sometimes the students will this is where they’ll say this was really frustrating. Or they’ll say it was frustrating at first, but then I understood Yeah, and it’s where I noticed like, oh, the learning curb for this type of exit ticket or activity, it’s pretty high. So maybe I have to, you know, layer it in before I actually use something like jam board for the first time I obviously have to be abused it before. That’s if I’m going to go to with tech.

Brent Warner
Yeah. And then the last one is prompts that are open communications to the teacher. And I would think that this one would also be one that you would like a lot.

Ixchell Reyes
Oh, yeah, yes, absolutely. This is where, you know, these are open ended questions. And it really just, you know, one question, but it sort of pushes the student to verbalize something about their learning experience or their understanding. And perhaps it’s a message a direct message to the teacher. And then the teacher can either address that individually or as a class the next day or the next lesson, whatever. But this is actually, I feel like this is a little treasure chest where you figure you get more, you get very direct feedback from the students. And it’s what helps you to shape the next lesson. And this, I look forward to reading these even if there’s somewhere I feel like, hey, this lesson didn’t go so well. I’m gonna get like, go find it out and the exit tickets, and it might be the opposite, right? He feel like the lesson was amazing. But then it’s like, oh, I guess they didn’t really understand it from this concept. I’ve kind of got every teacher or I’ve got to review a few things.

Brent Warner
You really pop my balloon there. Yeah. And I’ve seen a lot of teachers

Ixchell Reyes
happened. It’s true, though. Yeah.

Brent Warner
But I think that, you know, I’ve seen a number of teachers that post things like, it’s just kind of like, what would you like to say to the teacher? Or, you know, it could even just be like, you know, how are you feeling? In general?

Ixchell Reyes
How can I help you, during the pandemic? Asking a lot of those kinds of questions. I know that they’re in my TOEFL class that I taught recently. One way that I would I would use them as check in sexually or transitions to classes, not as as an exit ticket. But the question that you could ask now is, how can I help you understand this better? And, you know, the student can say, in writing, or I want more listening examples, or I want more practice with the grammar or the grammar is easy, but I haven’t been feeling well. And that’s like, you know, you know, sometimes that happens, there’s issues going on at home, that are affecting the student in the class. And so that’s where you could find out as well.

Brent Warner
Yeah, yeah. So I think this one kind of leaves a lot of room for that, like, social emotional learning area. Right? Right. It’s like you’re just trying to community build, you’re just trying to, like, create relationships with your students. And it could be just a really broad, open ended question like anything you want to share? Right? And, and, you know, I’ve seen these things on on Twitter and different teachers sharing, it’s like, they’re, like shocked at the, the like confessions or the the things that students are willing to confide with them. So I think there’s just a lot of different possibilities. So again, just to get started, those are the four different kinds of exit ticket prompts. And so you don’t have to feel stuck with like, oh, I always have to ask a grammar question. Or I always have to ask a right to be content focused, right, you can get so you can go so many different directions. Basically, you can ask a question, you can turn it into an exit ticket prompt, right? And yeah, for different purposes.

Ixchell Reyes
And, you know, Brett, there’s times where I’ve, recently I’ve done sort of like an exit ticket with these teachers after. And of course, they’re, you know, Japanese teachers. So the expectation is that they don’t out of questions and costs, and they’re shy, kind of shy to, or reticent to share how they really feel about something. And I, you know, I give them and we’ll talk about it in the next segment, but I gave them post it notes to write their one thing they’re interested in. And one thing they want me to know, either about themselves, or they want to share with me, and one teacher role, I want to introduce you to the Japanese drama, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But you know, what a great way to communicate and to start building rapport with a student who might otherwise not interrupt the class to tell me that because they don’t, you know, they don’t want to interrupt

Brent Warner
me, right. I love that. Yeah.

Ixchell Reyes
So it’s important to know how to structure your exit ticket, and we found some tips from the learning resources at Brown University has a great page with sample exit tickets. And here are some of the pointers which you’re going to find a little similar to the warm up strategy. So you know, you’ve got to remember that an exit ticket is a synthesizer of what the students viewed in a lesson and should definitely be clear in what it’s measuring. You can’t expect that a student knows what a one to five scale is. Because a one might be best weather, one might be worse depending on their culture and their perception. So make sure that it’s clear so that also the information is helpful to you. And it’s helpful for the students. It should be brief one, one to two minutes to complete, because it’s a summarizer, of what you’ve seen in the lesson. And another thing that I thought was really important here is that open responses should be kept from being part of the formal assessment, because this is where the students are going to be telling you feedback for. And that should be used to inform future instruction or lesson organization.

Brent Warner
Yeah, I think there’s a lot of really good ideas there. And then that page on Brown also gave like, a fairly long list not not huge, but like a number of different types of questions. Right. So I thought it was just interesting to, I think one of the things that’s like, well, what am I gonna write the? What’s the question going to be right? And so like having a little list or a reference that you can just go and check and go, okay, yeah, that’s right, I can do this. And so I think, you know, one of the ones they had on there was right, or ask one question about today’s content, and then something that has left you puzzled, right, or, you know, read this problem and tell me what your first step would be in solving it, right, like so. So not getting into like figuring out every single thing, it’s, again, you’re always looking for something that can kind of be answered in 30 seconds or less. Maybe I don’t know if there’s a specific number, but you don’t want it to be like a five minute exercise, right? You want to get it right. You want to get it short, and the end? Yeah. So there’s a lot of really great things inside of there. Also kind of shifting to a different article, there was an Edutopia article. And I liked how they kind of broke down this is like after you start collecting that data, and what can you do to with that data? And how can how can you use it right? And so they talked about this idea of using it to differentiate your instruction. And I, you know, this just makes perfect sense is that you can look at the class as a whole, right? So you can say, hey, what’s the whole class picture? What’s everybody kind of, in general saying, is most of the class getting it? Or is most of the class not getting it? And how is that going to inform my instruction, but then you can also look at, you know, individual students struggles and successes, and you can kind of create a customized learning plan for those students, and say, Hey, like, I see that you’re struggling with this, like, let me offer you some resources that can help you follow up on it a little bit more, or let’s come talk about it in a conference when you know, we can chat about what’s what’s holding you back, or what you’re, what you’re not understanding about those types of things. And then you can use all of these, like all of this data to kind of both customize your needs for that one class, but also like how you might teach it in the future, as well. So you don’t just want to kind of collect that stuff, you want to kind of use it as a reflection piece for you as a teacher to really understand, you know, to improve your teaching,

Ixchell Reyes
right. And so if you want to take a look at different examples of what this looks like, and what you know, what, how to make a better exit ticket, we’re gonna post an article from nsta.org. And it’s got, you know, lots of examples and the different categories, and then ways to improve them. And just, you know, it’s just really straightforward and clear.

Brent Warner
I really liked that article, too. NSTA is, probably most of our listeners don’t know it. It’s National Science Teachers Association. But it was it was a great PDF really, really useful. Because what it did is it showed people trying like going through the process of building exit tickets, and then getting responses on them showing, well, this might be a problem because of this, or you could improve your exit ticket by doing this. And so it gives you that chance to dig in a little bit and go oh, yeah, like, there are some things for me to think about, even though it’s not particularly hard, I still want it to be functional, and I want it to be fast. And I want it to be something that the the students can can use without, you know, too many hiccups, I guess, in that whole process. So, so that’s some of the resources again, all of those are gonna be on the on the show notes, and please go check them out.

Ixchell Reyes
As always, we’d love your support for the show. And iTunes review does wonders for it, and it only takes about five minutes. So it’s a chance to win a free pin. If you want to support us and

Brent Warner
by n people. We’ve done it mentioned this before, but like Yeah, some people are like, Oh, I’m gonna get a writing utensil, and it’s like, no, you’re gonna get a lovely enamel pin with your face in my face on it. Yeah, you don’t sound very excited.

Ixchell Reyes
Anyway, leave us a note. Or you can also buy us a coffee. It’s getting cold, so keep us toasty. And you can satisfy your craving for more diesel with the Patreon.

Brent Warner
Yeah. And we will say, for you know, the buying us a coffee some people have been doing that we are very grateful and appreciative and so, Joanne Cheetham is one of the people who recently bought us a coffee and thank you so much, Joanne, we’re enjoying it keeping keeping us warm as we’re in this colder season. So thanks, Joanne, and anybody else who would like to support us, I think you can go to buy me a coffee.com/diesel. Or anyways, we’re in the show notes, you can go find it. We are grateful for anyone in any way that you choose to support the show. Alright, so Ixchell, we are talking, you know about these exit tickets. And there’s tons of different ways to do this. And it’s really not too hard. So I thought we might just jump into some of the tools that people can use. Most of them are free or have a free version that you can make it work with. So let’s jump in.

Ixchell Reyes
Alright, our first tool is it’s been around for a while it’s Socratic. Socratic Socratic, oh,

Brent Warner
my gosh, you know, I sent them how to pronounce. I forget what they said. But

Ixchell Reyes
either way, either way, pronunciation. It’s, it’s a great tool. This is one of the first tools I ever used. They’ve gone through a lot of Oh, yeah, it’s gone through a lot of changes in terms of its interface and the kind of data you can get from it. So now I find it maybe a little bit overwhelming, but it’s very nice for a higher education setting. I know there’s a lot of tools for elementary school and K through 12. But this one’s one that I this is exactly actually why I got into a lot of the EdTech because I thought whoa, I could do this and get instant feedback and do a little racist. So if you’re used to Kahoot it’s more of a looks a little more academic.

Brent Warner
Yeah, it’s a little bit more like I want to I don’t want like yeah, database than game based.

Ixchell Reyes
Yes. Yeah. Right. Right. You’re correct.

Brent Warner
Yeah. Yeah. Socrative is great. And then kind of along those lines, there’s another one that’s a little bit more animated, I guess. And kind of maybe more, slightly more modern looking. But it’s Mentimeter. It’s really popular. A lot of the a lot of the universities have like contract access to multimeter. I’ve noticed that like when I talk to university professors, they’re like, Yeah, I use multimeter all the time, because my school pays for it. Like, the other teachers are less likely to have used it because they don’t have the contract, but you can still get some free versions out of it. And even right in when you sign up, I think you can get a few free posts before you have to kind of close them down and open up the new ones or whatever. But right off the bat, there is an option for an exit ticket style question. And it kind of brings everything up in like these like horizontal polls, and it raises the questions and like shows you like some cool like cool visuals and cool graphics. So Mentimeter might be a good way if you want to kind of visualize the output of what people are responding to.

Ixchell Reyes
So the next tool is Padlet and again, this is one of the earlier tools that we we’ve been using another I found a way like 10 years ago almost Padlet but it’s very it’s very the learning curve for this one is just so low that any could simply go in there and type and move things around. It’s another I guess you could sort of compare it to jam board is just a little bit easier to use I think and set up. Yeah. On the on any other end.

Brent Warner
Yeah, Padlet is well Padlet has grown a lot to over the years like it used to just be type your thing in and that’s it now you can do like voice responses, and you can post in links to pictures and gifts and all those different things. So So actually, it might be kind of fun to do a an exit ticket with a gift, right? Like how are you feeling post a gift or something like that? Yeah, yeah, that could be a fun way. So So Padlet is great. And also like, you can also do that anonymously. So people can post and you can kind of see the whole group’s answers and but they don’t have to feel called out necessarily on the answers with Padlet. So I like how that could be a potential to Next one is Google Forms, obviously pretty straightforward. I really liked Google Forms as an option. Because it could just be one question, right? Like, it could really just be easy one question, write your answer, click it and be done. And you could send that out to the class. And then you can have the information in a quick little spreadsheet for yourself to look at. And so I think that, you know, one, it’s free, of course, and easily easy access to it. So I think Google Forms could be a really great way to do it. And it’s easy to share out a link to everybody. So that’s another possibility.

Ixchell Reyes
There next one is just a simple one to zoom reactions. It’s just, you know, click on certain things to see. Thumbs up, thumbs down. And this is great. With large classes. Yeah, you can you know, this, especially if you’re still teaching online. If you’re not teaching online, I was just doing some kind of training with students on Zoom, and I only had three. But I didn’t want students to interrupt each other. So I just said, Whenever you hear this, send the thumbs up, don’t even go to the chat. Because sometimes if they’re using a mobile device, they lose the main screen, if they click on the chat, adjust the simple thumbs up and thumbs down, gives feedback to other people as well.

Brent Warner
Yeah, and we’ve talked about this before Ixchell, but one of the things that’s, you know, really powerful is icons and emojis as ways to express right. And with more modern versions of zoom, you can, the reactions are not limited just to the thumbs up and the clapping in the heart, you know, like, you can click on these three dots, and you can open them up to almost all the emoji and so. So that can be a lot of fun, too, as kind of different ways to express your ideas or your thinking. Next up, we’ll keep this one short, but there is an oldie but a goodie, another one called Plickers. I don’t know if you remember Ixchell, I used to do presentations on Plickers. early on. And I do yeah. And that’s a great one too, if the students don’t have tech and Ixchell that might be kind of your current situation where, you know, the students don’t have so much access to all the digital devices, but you do as a teacher. And so they can just hold up. Basically, they’re given QR codes, right, and then they can turn the QR codes in different directions. And you can just scan it with your phone and then see what the class responses are to. So that can be potentially a really fun way to work with, you know, classes that don’t have all the technology built in.

Ixchell Reyes
So of course that and we’re getting to the more low tech type things. So a whiteboard, you know how the students go up on the whiteboard and write things down. They don’t have to speak something. You can have them draw things, I had students explain something and they didn’t have the vocabulary. And that’s how I knew I was like, Oh, the student can’t explain. Alright, go to the board and show me really quick before you go. And he was able to draw a timeline. So we were discussing the difference between what the word was farther. And he didn’t have the vocabulary, of course to explain it, but I knew he knew it. But I wanted, I wanted him to actually try and get beyond that. Because in a real life situation, we don’t want to freeze you want the student to say, Oh, I’ve got to explain that I’ve got got to go farther, or I went farther. Okay, take out a little piece of paper, draw it for the prison, then you’ve communicated your concept, right? So teaching them those other methods, the same thing. So a whiteboard is excellent for this kind of stuff.

Brent Warner
You know, what I was also thinking about when you’re talking about the whiteboards is like, a lot of them have, like, you know, they’re magnetic. And so if you have a job, I was I was thinking lower tech than digital, I was thinking just magnets, right? Because you could say, hey, on the left side of the board, you know, I think this on the right side of the board, I think that are like, you know, how what do you you know, how well do you understand this, place a magnet somewhere on the board, and, you know, and and just walk out the door, you’re done. That’s it. And so then you as the teacher, you don’t have to wait around for the students, you can just go in and reflect on that afterwards and take a look at where all the magnets are roughly placed. Right. So there could be some kind of fun ways to play around with it that way.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah. And then, of course, Brett, I think I also wanted to mention the little whiteboards, individual whiteboards, that you know, students can show show your hand them individual whiteboards, but another helpful thing here is the teacher can’t pictures of that. And then either print them or use them for artifacts in a in a portfolio or something like this. And you can also then go back I do that all the time. Take pictures of what the students wrote. And I’ll say remember when you did this, and that create a point of reference sometimes so it helps

Brent Warner
love it. Yeah, that’s great. Um, next is pieces of paper. What a surprise!

Ixchell Reyes
Where can you get one of those?

Brent Warner
Exit slips! That’s a good question. And we’re, we’re, where do you get slips of paper these days. So, check, check underneath your, your old cupboard in there, you might be able to find a few to strip and strip into little pieces. But yeah, just you know, a little piece of paper and they can just drop them off on your desk as they’re walking out the door. You know, super low tech, super, super simple, but you can still get the information you’re looking for.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, I mean, you can just make it fun by adding like, an empty tissue paper box and call it your mailbox.

Brent Warner
You’re bringing it back to the proper elements. I love it.

Ixchell Reyes
And then sticky notes, I sticky notes for very individualized or very specific lesson content. So I was teaching pronunciation or I was, you know, helping students with pronunciation. And I wanted first I wanted to see what they heard me say what they heard each other say, and also, I wanted them to realize that, Hey, you think you’re hearing something, but you’re not hearing a sound. And when you make when you make that realization yourself, you can start actually becoming more aware of how you’re moving your muscles. So with the R and L, I had students, you know, hold up a sticky note with the letter R on it. And then one with the letter L. And of course I had them color coded to for the students who are visual learners who might remember Oh, yes, the R is the pink, the L is a blue. And so you know, I would say a word they hold up if whether they heard an R or an L. And then they’d look at each other. And then we would be surprised that the rest of the class had one color where the other where the student was holding a different color. And that actually helped them to see it. You can do that for yes or no questions, you can do that with numbers for a scale. You can do the same thing with Little Dixie cups. I like to have like the plastic ones that people use for like, shots. I guess that’s what they were for tea like Arabic, maybe I have Arabic tea, okay? Because they last longer. So the Dixie cups are going to throw away, you don’t want to throw them away every time. But you can have these for voting or for agree or disagree. Do you agree? And then students who are who are always waiting for someone else to say something first? And then they’ll change their answer based on that. You can just say, oh three, we’re going to we’re going to vote with your cup. You flip it means yes. Flip it the other way means no or etc, something like that. That you understand yes, that you understand No, and everybody votes. And there’s really no nothing like personal I think having that copy that external. Visual response takes away the pressure of like, oh, I have to answer like my classmates I like so I’ve done that way.

Brent Warner
It’s not the voting. It’s the cup.

Ixchell Reyes
Especially for agreeing and disagreeing. It’s like, do you agree that Do you agree? So the statement on the board might be I feel confident in with this topic? I feel prepared for the test. Yes or no. And that just gives you a clear yes or no. And then you might have a on a piece of paper. Now write what you’d like to do tomorrow, what you’d like to review. So that could you know, also enforce the fact that hey, speak, you got to speak up if you need something if you need review. You in American culture, you have to ask for

Brent Warner
it. Right. You know, something, and I know, we went down to the lowest tech we could get to here at the end, but something that you reminded me of by saying, you know, taking pictures of the little the personalized whiteboards, there’s also a really good app, the the three M sticky notes app, have you ever used that one Ixchell?

Ixchell Reyes
A lot. I know I have downloaded in the past.

Brent Warner
Yeah. So the that app is like, you just can quickly scan over any square sticky note, and it will digitally convert it for you. And then you have a whole access to it on your phone. Or I think you can log into the website too, as well. So so if you’re doing something like hey, write your answer down on a sticky note, and you just go scan them real quickly, then you could you don’t have to worry about like, Oh, am I gonna lose these sticky notes? Or am I gonna you know, like all those other parts of things, too. So, even though we tried to go as low tech as possible at the end there, I had to bring it back to a little bit of tech.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, it’s like, yep, can’t help. But hey, they do the job.

Brent Warner
Yeah, for sure. So I mean, you can do it any way that you like. So I hope some of those are useful. Lots of different ways to run exit tickets. Keep it fast. You know, you can spend as long as you need reflecting on it. But for the students, it should be like something they can do like just as they’re walking out the door. And there’s so many cool ways that you can kind of benefit from this on a regular basis. I think I’m going to spend a little bit more time making sure that this is part of my app. for the future

Ixchell Reyes
and it’s time for our fun finds and this time around I have a drink it’s a mutual beauty vinegar sour brand Have you had

Brent Warner
one? I can’t say that I have

Ixchell Reyes
so I saw the name and I just thought a Vinegar? Vinegar – I mean, I guess apple cider vinegar is a thing. But then it was a beauty vinegar sour. So this is supposed to help with your skin because it’s infused with some kind of fruit that is good

Brent Warner
very well. Kind of fruit that is good. Mm hmm.

Ixchell Reyes
Well, it’s a fruit I’ve never heard of. It’s like calla Calla. Calla man cysts or something like this. Charlemagne never. That’s not a fruit. Wasn’t a mouse. Okay, so good. Color Monsey or color Mon Cala monzi. It’s in Japanese. I am not very good at reading it. But yeah, it’s pretty good. Okay, so let me find it in your local Japanese shop. The Japanese market. That’s a meto beauty vinegar sour.

Brent Warner
Alright.

Ixchell Reyes
Just nothing like vinegar is delicious.

Brent Warner
Alright, so mine is going back to my problems about Apple. I’m not done talking about this

Ixchell Reyes
rant rant rant.

Brent Warner
It’s called the nacho app. N-O-T-C-H-O, it is. So this is probably everybody listening is well past this problem. But I am not because I hate the notch at the top of the iPhone, you know, that little black box that pops down where the camera is. And so anyways, this app is it’ll take whatever you want as a picture. And it will, it will beautify it where it’ll it’ll drop the picture down. Basically, it just puts a black bar on the top of it so that you’re when you’re looking at your home screen or when you’re looking at your lock screen. You can’t see that notch popping into your blocking part of your picture and it’s got the you know, it’s got the matching curve designed for everything but basically all it does is it crops your picture so that it fits into your phone without looking like you’ve got that ugly black notch it’s called NOTCHO I paid $2 for it and it was so worth it to fix the ugly ugly ugly design the have the new iOS with the with this phone,

Ixchell Reyes
End rant.

Well, thanks so much for listening to the show. You could win a one of a kind diesel pin, as we said by leaving us a review on Apple podcasts. And if you’re giving us a shout out any other way, be sure to tag us on social media. We’re on all the platforms. Yes, thank

Brent Warner
you so much for listening. As we mentioned before, we’re also on Patreon or also on you can just buy us a coffee. You can find the show notes for this show and other episodes@diesel.org Slash 55 and you can listen to us on voiceED Canada at V O I C ed.ca. You can also find us on Twitter. The show is at @DIESOLpod and I am at @BrentGWarner.

Ixchell Reyes
I’m Ixchell at @Ixy_pixy that’s I x y underscore pi x y in Maori thank you is Chiara Chiara for tuning in to the DIESOL podcast.

Brent Warner
Thanks everybody. Have a good one.

Ixchell Reyes
See ya!

In this episode we explore using Exit Tickets. Why use them? What do effective Exit Ticket strategies look like? We discuss Marzano’s approach to Exit Tickets and share some ideas that Brent and Ixchell have tried in the classroom.

Articles

Tools

  • Socrative
  • Mentimeter
  • Padlet
  • Google Forms
  • Zoom Reactions
  • Plickers
  • Whiteboard
  • Pieces of paper
  • Sticky Notes / Cups for yes /no and voting 

Fun Finds 

  • Ixchell – Beauty Vinegar Sour
  • Brent – Notcho App
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

%d bloggers like this: