Episode Transcript
Ixchell Reyes
The DIESOL podcast,

Brent Warner
Digital Integration in English as a the Second or Other Language,

Ixchell Reyes
Episode 41 Interactive Video and Captions in Language Learning.

Brent Warner
Welcome to DIESOL. This is Episode 41. And we are your hosts. I am Brent Warner.

Ixchell Reyes
And I’m Ixchell Reyes. Hey, Brent. Hi. Happy Teacher Appreciation Week.

Brent Warner
Oh, is it Teacher Appreciation Week? Thank you!

Ixchell Reyes
Tuesday is National Teacher Appreciation Day. So be sure to do a Google search to see what kind of freebies you can get

Brent Warner
Are there freebies? What happens on that?

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, on Tuesday, I think start I’m not sure about Starbucks, it might depend on the region. But I think McDonald’s and a bunch of other restaurants. Usually Chipotle, it does a free burrito. I’m not sure if they’ve changed this year. But there’s a bunch of freebies. So do a search to see what’s in your area.

Brent Warner
Cool. I had no idea.

Ixchell Reyes
And I appreciate you!

Brent Warner
Thank you. I appreciate you too. So we’ve been doing some of the clubhouse stuff, which has been fun. I like our 30 minute format. And so thank you, for those of you who have joined and listened in it’s kind of been growing a little bit every time. And so we had a fair amount of people last week. And we’ve got students coming in. We’ve got teachers coming in, it’s a kind of a cool little little crowd going on there.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, we’ve seen people in other countries, which is one of the goals that we have for this podcast is to reach other people. But it’s really nice to be able to reach those people who are on at that moment live from other countries. So thank you for joining us.

Brent Warner
Yeah, and for those who are listening, I know a few people have said like, Hey, I don’t have an Android. But I think there’s Sorry, I have an Android so I can’t get on. But I think an android version is coming out this month. So keep keep an eye. Yeah, should be good. Yeah. All right.

So

let’s get into it. Alright, so Ixchell we talk today, we’re going to talk about interactive video and captions and language learning. I don’t Well, I assume you didn’t study Spanish in high school, obviously. Well, maybe I don’t know. What’s what the schools make you do? Like they had all sorts of weird things are like, Oh, you’re a native English or native native Spanish speaker. Why don’t you go take this Spanish class. But regardless, I took Spanish in high school and we had to watch a video called destino. So have you heard of this?

Ixchell Reyes
Is it like a soap opera thing? Yeah, I’ve heard of it.

Brent Warner
It’s like a language learning telenovela. And it’s like, you know, it’s super cheesy. And, you know, it’s a story, I honestly can’t remember the characters, I just remember watching it and being like, you know, Ricardo as movie felt day or whatever it might have been right, and then they would slow down so that you can kind of capture but it was a story that went through everything, right? So you’re watching these videos. And so all this to say that from early days, I think a lot of teachers have used video and used you know, whether it was videos, or DVDs or online streaming, or whatever it is we’ve we’ve used a lot of video services to help learn language. And so today, we wanted to talk a little bit about using video, a little bit of the research, of course, and also maybe some ways or some tools that can help people do that. Right. Okay, so one of the first articles that I looked at, it was only about videos. So it’s not even getting into the interactive things, which I think we’re going to want to talk about, but just the videos alone. And this article was called the use of videos as a cognitive stimulator and instructional tool in tertiary ESL classrooms by our young Zinn and do it in the Malaysian Journal of educational technology. But basically, what it had showed that is that videos alone, and again, nothing special just watching the videos, right? It can help retain the subject content. And so they there’s a quote in there that said from Heron and handily 1992 asserted that the use of video facilitates foreign language or the learning of a second language in the aspects of comprehension, and retention of content by rendering the information more meaningful to learners. I mean, you know, some of these things sound obvious, but it’s nice to have a little backup to to make sure that you’re like, Oh, yeah, this is true, right. And because it does become more meaningful when we watch a video about something relevant to us than it is like just the teacher talking in front of the class or maybe writing something up on the whiteboard. Right? Right. So that was useful. And then it also they pointed out that it can contextualize learning. And they pointed out in their article, they said it was found that many of the first year students knowledge of cultural information significantly improved from watching narrative videos. And this is something for years, even when it was back like DVDs and and things like that. I was like, Oh, I would go buy DVDs so that I could show parts of these things to my students in order to like, say, hey, do you understand like some of these cultural things that are going on inside of this movie or inside of this television show? Because that is a lot more clear to see like a drama using something than it is for, again, the same type of thing, just a teacher to say, Well, hey, did you know that Americans believe this, right. And so when they can see it, or they can kind of understand it through some sort of acting or some context in the video, with characters that they care about, it connects them a lot more to it. So then one other article that I wanted to share here, the effects of problem, sorry, the effective problem based video instruction on learner satisfaction, comprehension, and retention in college courses, by choice. And Johnson in the British Journal of educational technology, points out that there were significant differences and learners satisfaction, comprehension, and delayed retention, which is important, right? So they’re saying, hey, they kept this information for longer when they’re doing things through project based video instructions, rather than project based text instructions. So if you get all this stuff written down, versus if you watch a video and kind of interact with it, then you are going to have a lot better, so that the students will be happier, right, they will understand more, and they will keep that information for longer, which is a pretty cool thing to think about and to understand.

Ixchell Reyes
That’s really interesting. And I agree with you, Brent, because one of the units that I teach, teach us workshop vocabulary and tool vocabulary. To build a birdhouse, that’s the project the students do. But I found that number one building a birdhouse doesn’t necessarily connect with many of our students, especially in other cultures. And I personally don’t really care about birdhouses. So in order to make that work,

Brent Warner
bird community is going to wait I’m

Ixchell Reyes
sorry, I do not mean any offense to the bird community or the bird house community out there. But what I have found is that a video explaining how to build the tool, the bird house with the tool vocabulary, and this was just, you know, a video, I think it’s done by some they sell tools, and they they review tools, that is so much more interesting to the students. And they’re able to then retell the process of building the tool house applying the vocabulary, and so that I have substituted what’s in the book with the video. And it just makes it so much more entertaining and pain free for the student.

Brent Warner
Yeah, isn’t that interesting? Because it’s the same topic, right? Like, but

Ixchell Reyes
it makes that topic. Yeah.

Brent Warner
Yeah, that’s amazing. So I totally get that too. Because sometimes I’ll be like, Oh, it’s just so dry. Right. But then when you watch the video, you can see what the person’s doing and how they’re talking about it. So

Ixchell Reyes
right, and I think many teachers with that with that specific unit will say, well just have them build a birdhouse, you know, go to the craft store. But I found that students actually don’t care for it. They, they feel like why, why are we doing this? I’m not a kid, or I’m not, you know, I don’t they don’t find a purpose. But with the video, it’s just different. They’re actually in a workshop with real tools. And now when I’ve got when I have this students retell, and give me the steps, because it’s a process that they have to be able to retell with the vocabulary, they’re able to recall what the what was that in the video, not only that, but then if I turn off the sound, they can come up with their own sentences, and they’re able to then tell me like, what, what are the steps for building up a birdhouse? What tools do you need? What are the verbs that we use with those tools? So it’s very interesting. And I always mentioned it to other colleagues who said, that particular unit is dry and hard to teach, or, you know, not fun to teach. But never underestimate the power of one of those videos.

Brent Warner
Yeah, I would also follow up on that, like, I don’t know about you, Ixchell. But how many times do you watch a video of something that you would never actually do or make yourself but like, just watching the video is kind of interesting, right? Like, Oh, yeah,

Ixchell Reyes
yeah. It’s like those. You know, those My nephew, I have a four year old nephew and he loves watching those toy opening videos, they they unwrap a toy. And that’s something that my sister is never going to purchase for him. But then he gains a vocabulary and he’ll say things to my sister and my sister will say, Where’d you learn that? And it just came from a video of someone unboxing or unwrapping a toy and talking about it. So with all of those review videos that you see out there, yeah, that yeah, definitely look into that. Cool, cool, maybe a future future episode.

Brent Warner
So we can’t really talk about videos without talking about captions as well. Right, right. It’s such a powerful part of videos. And so Ixchell I know, you did some research on this. So what’d you come up with?

Ixchell Reyes
So the reason why I’m interested in captions so much is because like you said, I didn’t have to learn Spanish in high school. But I did study Japanese and other languages. And one of the things that helped me a lot was turning on the captions while I was watching something, especially as an emergent learner. And I’ve run into instructors who will say no, no, no, this is a listening activity, you are not going to turn on the captions, you should be able to understand. So I would say that it depends on the goal of the activity. But if the goal is to have students be notice more of the vocabulary or notice how things are pronounced, you might want to have that on and I actually always tell my students, Hey, you know what, I learned all I picked up a lot of vocabulary from reading the captions, subtitles on movies, television shows. So I don’t see why not as a language learner, I’m going to do that. And then as you progress in your learning, we can now start taking away that that extra support. But the articles that I read were on websites that we you’ve probably heard of. So Reading Rockets had a whole article called captioning to support literacy. And this is where I feel captions are extremely important. And Elise brand in 2011, looked at research that has shown watching videos appears to have a positive impact on comprehension skills, and combining with the text or captions will boost vocabulary acquisition. And it addresses the skill deficits of struggling readers. And so I will tell you over and over again, there were many times when I had studied something in class, and then I had seen the word and my brain on a video and my brain made that connection. And also learned a new context in which to use that word in. They also in this in this article, they also found that students who are learning English or another language showed improvement in reading, listening comprehension, word recognition, which is very important decoding skills, motivation and vocabulary acquisition. So with all of those, you know, if we have someone who is a good reader, then they’re going to expand their vocabulary. And so for me, oftentimes, a challenge is that students don’t like to read outside of their class time, they don’t have the time or there may not be more may or may not be motivated. But showing a video with the captions actually does help them and if you give them a specific goal, like hey, or purpose, like, Hey, we’re gonna watch this and I want you to us you’re, as we’re watching come up with five words or five phrases that you heard and then we’re going to talk about them at the end, then you’re not interrupting all the time to have to translate or to how to do a lot of that because that’s I know that that sometimes students want to translate every word. But, but you know, in terms of motivation, it helps to remove some of the anxiety of not knowing the language.

Brent Warner
Yeah, we, you know, my house is a multilingual house. And so we always have captions on all the time, right? Like they’re just part of whether it’s English, or whether it’s, you know, Japanese or other languages. We always have subtitles on right well, and even in that matching language, so when we’re watching English television, we have English subtitles on and we’re watching Japanese television, we have Japanese subtitles on. And that is super helpful to me. But you know, some people complain about having subtitles on. They’re like, I don’t want to read but like, it turns out, I read so much more now. Like, I read I enjoy reading it in English at the same time as I’m listening because I like to kind of see how words are played and put together and maybe I don’t totally understand or I’m like, Oh, yeah, that is a different way of using that phrase or that words or word or something. But then also for me when I’m, you know, kind of not really planning on doing any language study, but I just naturally want to like look up some of the words or you know, if it’s if it’s an Japanese words are coming up, I’ll naturally want to look them up. And even though I’m kind of watching for entertainment or for downtime, I can still use that as a little growth opportunity, too. So this, this all makes perfect sense to me. Yeah, and

Ixchell Reyes
you know, one of the things again, you’re not only seeing the seeing something play out in context, but you’re also reading it. So every time you’re reading it, or even sometimes, you know, as you’re reading, sometimes students are reading out loud or repeating. So that’s another chance to internalize certain grammar structures, you’re also picking up on different registers, right? So it fits a I don’t know, if it’s a it’s a serious movie or a drama, you’re gonna see different styles of speaking, you’re going to see different grammar structures. So another article that I found on net Ed Week, this was captioning gifts, literacy of boost. And in that article, they talked about a study done with students in Hawaii to see if karaoke style subtitling improved reading comprehension. So they use broad music goals, to support reading strategies. And so students were listening to the music and followed along with texts as if they were doing karaoke. And so what they found was that, Oh, no, and as they were watching the students, or as they were listening, they were watching videos, they would answer questions about what they were reading or listening to. They were doing. Well, this one didn’t have Hamilton, but I’ll tell you I got really good at at history by listening to Hamilton, Hamilton. So

Brent Warner
right like that.

Ixchell Reyes
It is very fast. Yeah.

Brent Warner
So I mean, that’s a conversation for another time. But that speed, there is just an interesting thing, like I guess, I would say that has to be a higher level student right to be able

Ixchell Reyes
to kill Absolutely. Yeah. So they use Katz and Les Miserables in this case. Although I would say I would argue that I have students who listen to m&m to learn Eminem songs to learn vocabulary, because a lot of his vocabulary is academic vocabulary, and then, you know, non academic vocabulary. But they’ll tell me, Hey, I heard this word, this word on a, an m&m song. Yeah. And other words. But anyway. So in the study, they found that students who had had same language subtitling intervention actually scored significantly higher on follow up tests of reading comprehension than the students who hadn’t. So this suggests that struggling students who are struggling with reading or learning English as a second language, or second or other language, that subsequent subtitling and captions can actually really help. And I, I actually do believe that sometimes I you know, play videos for my students. Without seeing the video, just the sound, and then I go back to the video, but play it with the captions and they’re able to recall so many more phrases. So instead of recalling one vocabulary word, they’ll recall, like the actual collocation, or three word phrase instead, and because they read it, and now they’re paying attention to other words next to it, or after it.

Brent Warner
Yeah, yeah, that totally makes sense. I could see where, you know, I’ve done that too. With my suggestion for students a lot of the times is like, watch it. Well, I mean, depending on what they have access to and you know, my old suggestions were watch it in watch it dubbed first so you understand the story, then move to watching it subtitled, then move to watching it without subtitles, right. And so moving through that path of like, your comfort with the story and your comfort with the background level, can then open up your understanding more and more. I don’t just mean one time, one time, one time, but like, you know, stories that you’re interested in, that you would be willing to watch multiple times can be a great way for them to, to kind of pursue and then push themselves into more better understanding of the language as well.

Ixchell Reyes
Right.

Brent Warner
So yeah, we’ve got a few things on here. That’s great. And then I think this is, you know, there’s less studies so far on totally interactive videos. And this is kind of some of the areas we’re going to be sharing about later today with our with our actual tools. But I did find an article called augmented interactive video, enhancing video interactivity for the school classroom, and I am going to apologize right from the beginning because this is were done by some Greek researchers. And so my I my Greek I just my mouth always just tumbles over itself when I try to dry I try to say Greek words and Greek names, but here I go, is by cousin netus. polygraph Georgios Papadopoulos and senoko. So I think that’s not too bad. And so it’s written in the Journal of Engineering Science and Technology Review. And then basically, this was an interesting article, it went right past, it just blew past the whole interactive video thing. And it went into like, hold on a second. Now, when we’re using interactive videos, they’re fine when students are by themselves, but people using them inside of the classroom is not quite enough. And so they’re making an argument for using things like AR and VR as interactive videos inside of a physical classroom. Which I think is a not a conversation that most of us are ready to, to explore. I mean, I, you know, it’s it’s an interesting conversation, but I don’t think a lot of teachers are practically ready to implement AR and VR into the classroom on a daily basis, released many teachers are not. But it was interesting, because they’re talking about these interactive videos, which is they’ve said that there was evidence coming out of the literature, which suggested that interactive video is an attractive alternative for guiding students attention, also for reducing cognitive overload, enhancing learning effectiveness, and motivating the students to learn more. And so I think this idea, and, and again, we’ll get into some of these points, but you know, when you can watch for a short amount of time, and then respond to it, and then watch again for a little bit of time, and then respond or go back, especially like with these some of these interactive video tools, you know, you can have the choice of like, I’m going to go back and I’m going to watch that again, or I didn’t totally pay attention, did I? Did I respond to that, right? That lets you kind of get more into it. And when our brains start to wander, and we kind of hold on a second, I’m talking, I’m thinking about something else. It these some of these interactive video tools, what they’ll do is they’ll stop, and they’ll say, Hey, are you paying attention? And let’s you kind of focus in on that. I think a little bit about like, choose your own adventure stories. Ixchell when I would read like, a page, right? And you’re like, Okay, cool. Am I ready to make my choice for going to the next page? Where do I want to go. But if I didn’t get it, or if I was like, or if I kind of was like, my brain was ended up going somewhere else, then that would be my marker of like, Oh, this is my place to stop. And make sure that I really understand why I’m making this choice. And so then I would go back and reread the page or reread that last paragraph, and then move forward into the choice. So I think we can talk about this. But this is kind of a way that interactive videos can allow us to move forward with this. So do you use much interactive videos? Or have you used them in the past?

Ixchell Reyes
I haven’t very much. Have you?

Brent Warner
Yeah, I I’ve used it a fair amount. And I’m getting better and better at it. But I think that’s a good reason for us to jump into sharing some of the tools and some of the ways that people can do that. So let’s do that right after the break.

Ixchell Reyes
So you don’t have any iTunes reviews this month. But we are listed as number one on eztoolset.com as one of the top eight ESL English as a second language podcast. So thank you for that.

Brent Warner
That’s nice. I didn’t even know there were eight ESL podcasts, which is great. No, well, there there are some out there. So cool. Let’s put the link in there eztoolset.com. Thank you for listing us there.

Alright, so some tools. So so he showed there’s lots of different ways to kind of work with videos. You know, I think I think teachers are a lot more comfortable with them now, even than they were a year ago for sure. And especially teachers who are doing like asynchronous work, because they’re saying, Hey, you guys got to go sore on your own, and we’re not going to come together. But we found a number of things that we can share that people can use. And so I think you got the first one. What did you find?

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, so cnn is one that I use. Often. It is the news around the world and nationally in 10 minutes. So usually it splits everything into three segments. And you’ve, you’ve got I would recommend using the captions, because it helps students to pick up a lot of phrasal verbs, a lot of new vocabulary, a lot of verbs. And so you’ll watch for 10 minutes and you can go back and have students retell what they saw and then look at vocabulary. Now the great thing I like about cnn 10 is that at the end of the week, they have lessons available that you can download or recap exercises. And so it will help the students to recall what they’ve watched and so they can again Reduce and share what they’ve internalized. Students tend to really respond well to CNN. The only thing is, I think at the end of the summer, they take a break, and they don’t return until August. So, but I really recommend that because especially working with our international students, they do cover international news within those 10 minutes. So it helps them to tie things outside of the United States as well.

Brent Warner
Cool. I have never even heard of that. So I’ll have to go check that out. My first one is lyrics training. This is a really cool site that again, going back to what you were talking about, Ixchell, with, you know, the musicals and those types of things. They basically pull in music videos, although they do also do television shows and things like that, where what they do is basically a clothes exercise on whatever song you’re interested in. And you can choose it by type of music that you like. So if you’re into pop, that’s fine. If you’re into heavy metal, that’s fine. If you’re into you know. I think even opera and like basically what it does is an emo Yeah, so you’re listening, and it gives, it gives, it gives texts along the bottom, and then it gives a close, right, so it gives a blank and then what and it stops when after it’s played that little section or that verse or chorus, and then you type in the word that’s missing inside of the inside of the clothes exercise. And then it tells you if you’re right or wrong, right. And then if you’re right, it lets you keep moving forward, if you’re wrong, it goes back and it plays that little section over again. So you can listen again and try and figure it out. It does all these extra things that like adding up points on like how accurate your were on all these things. And so it can be a little bit gamified on top of it. But I actually first heard about this from our French teacher in our department here. And she’s like, Oh, you know, like, have you ever used this thing? It’s so cool. And I was like, oh, wow, this is, you know, it’s not super fancy looking. But lyrics training.com I believe, right? Yeah, lyric training, calm, lets you practice and really interact with the songs. And I like it too, because it goes back to what we’re talking about is it’s when you find something that you’re interested, you’re going to be much more engaged with it.

Ixchell Reyes
Yeah, and my students, what they what I tend to find is, they find a song they like, and then they play it over and over and over and over again. And then they by the end of I don’t know, however many times they play it, they’ve memorized it, because they’ve seen the lyrics rather than just listening to it or following a lyric sheet somewhere else. So I really like that. The next one is one we’ve talked about before, this is you glish you glish calm, which takes videos from YouTube. And you’re able to click or you’re able to search for a specific chunk of text. So let’s say if you were doing phrasal verbs, you wanted to type in a phrasal verb, then it pulls up, pulls up a video where the speaker is saying that phrasal verb within some kind of context, so you could actually click through and see how the speaker is using it. What topic is mostly tends to come up. And also pronunciation because there’s a lot of times where the speakers, you know, will pronounce according to their region or their personality. So you can use it for grammar structures. So if you’re looking at passives, you might you might type in a word and see what what passive verb is used right after it. And so students actually really like to see that and they’ll tell me like, Hey, I, I saw this on you glish. And then I noticed that they used it in this case, what and then they’ll ask the question, but it really supports them seeing what comes before the word what comes after the word, what that sentence looks like, what the context of that sentence is, and so you have a lot of authentic samples of speaking and, and then they’re reading it, so they internalize the spelling of that, which is great.

Brent Warner
Yeah, one of the cool things also about you glish is you can click, I think it’s North American English and British English right up at the top. Yeah, and Australian and Australian. Yeah. So so it’ll it’ll isolate those different ones. I use this actually a week or two ago for, for my students to understand transitional phrases, right. And so it was great because it’s like, I was doing you know, I made like a slideshow and then each slide had like a little, you know, whatever the transitional phrase was, so it’s like, you know, anyways, or something like that, right? And so it’s like, okay, anyways, and then and then you go put it in a link to the video so they can go find it. One example that I show, but then they can just click on next and listen to like 100 different examples of people using that phrase. And so I think this is a great tool, which is Often under appreciated but but a really powerful couple other ones edpuzzle and play posit, I think we can’t really talk about this whole world of interactive video without without putting these two in. So edpuzzle and play posit edpuzzle calm and play posit calm, that’s p LAYPO. si t. Both of these are kind of the leads in terms of the education world, where you will go load a video. So you will load up a YouTube video, or you can link up from lots of different sources. But essentially, what it does is it puts a layer on top of that video. And then it lets you create interactions as the teacher with these videos. And so you say, hey, at the 32nd mark, I want to pause and I want to put in a multiple choice question, or at the 45. second mark, I want to pause it and have a little discussion board that will show up right next to the video, or they have all these different little tools that you can use with it. So depending on the one that you’re using, and again, these go check with your school because this is hopefully they’re paying for it might cost you money if you’re using one of these independently. But these are really where currently the strength of interactive videos are. And then you can choose all sorts of things to do with them. So like I said, you can you can make choices as the teacher to say, hey, you can go back and you can review the last part of the video again, in order to show your understanding. If you’re doing something that’s a little bit more like an assessment, you could actually say, you can only watch this one time, and you have to listen and answer to you know, answer at one time. So you could make a video of yourself talking about something, make a screen recording, put that up, layer, add puzzle or play posit on top of it. And then that could actually be your quiz or your test for the class. Right. And so they could only watch the whole thing one time, they could, you know, interact with it lots of different ways they can do short answers, they can do you know, writing up responses, you can also just plug in a pause. So if it’s a video, something else, so if you’re watching a YouTube video, you can actually just have a pause, and then just add your own comments into it right on that spot. So there’s a lot this is really, there’s so much here to talk about, and so many different ways to use it. But for language learners, you know, as a thoughtful teacher, you can turn a short four minute video into like a 20 minute activity or a 30 minute activity, depending on how long they have to think about everything. So really here, there is a lot to be used and a lot to explore with for helping your students move along. But also keeping in mind the things that we talked about before of like, Hey, why don’t I do something that’s culturally engaging? or Why don’t I do something that is, you know, fun for them, because then it’s just watching the video, and they’re just gonna, they’re gonna be watching it anyways. And then they’re gonna interact with it at the same time or respond to it or, or build their own ideas on top of it. So edpuzzle and play posit both of those are really excellent choices for tools.

Ixchell Reyes
So I have a new one that was shared with us by Luna from Episode 40. And that is what pecker app. And this is pretty cool. Looks like it’s only available for mobile devices at the moment. It’s an app that pulls different high interest videos. So you might have stuff from NPR, Ted calm. There’s a few from different English channels. I believe there was also BBC learn English, I think that’s what it’s called. But what it does is it plays the video, and then it isolates each segment of, of speech, and you can see it so you can see the transcript. And then what you can do is you can click on a word and it’ll bring up the word in a dictionary or a translator. So right now it’s only limited to about seven languages. So so it looks like it’s in development, but it from what I could gather, and as I poked around, it looks like it’s a well done app. I didn’t find any obtrusive ads or anything like that. I didn’t have any ads popping up at all. So woodpecker app is something worth checking out.

Brent Warner
Thanks, Luna, for sure. Luna. Luna actually sent me an email after our recording and she’s like, wait, I forgot to share about this and this and this and this. And this. And I’m like, Well, I guess we’ll have to wait to her for a future time to talk about the more more things that are on there, but I’m sure woodpecker is one of those two, so awesome. And then the last one I think we’ll talk about here, at least for these basic tools is spiral.ac. I hadn’t heard of this before, but it looks pretty robust. Basically, what it is, is another interactive one. And it lets you interact with many different types of things. So including, like interactive whiteboards and things. But I’m just gonna focus in on the one that’s a video right now, which is called clip. So if you go to spiral.ac, and then you go to clip, it says on their page, it says, turn any public video into a live chat with questions and quizzes, watch what the classes they answer each question or post review and grade an assignment for the students to complete on their own time. So it’s kind of cool, like it turns your video into a live chat as you’re going through and watching it, which I think is a kind of a fun way to do it, which doesn’t work. So well in zoom, I don’t know, like, sometimes you can do it. But like, I like that it’s built in as a single platform. And then there’s no real logging into this either, which is one of my favorite things for edtech tools, which is just give me the code and you can access and start doing it right away with the students so, so spiral.ac, and you can go in and look for one of their multiple tools, but this one is called clip.

Ixchell Reyes
Very cool, that’s new for me. Then we have two other tools, which are I think we’ve talked about them many times, they are favorites of ours. But if we would like students to be creating their own stuff, so you know, have an image and overlay text, you could be using spark video, and spark video just comes up so much because of the ease of use, and the fact that it’s free. And you can you know, you can create something pretty cool in a very short time. Plus, it’s just so I find that students creativity shoots through the roof when they see what they can create and make it look so professional. So spark video, you could you could even have a clip from that you’re sharing and then have them come up with alternative subtitles or captions.

Brent Warner
Yeah, lots of cool things. And we have at least one episode about spark video. So we’ll share that in the show notes.

Ixchell Reyes
And the other one is also unfortunately, it’s Apple only. And this is clips. So those of you who are an apple clips is an app that will put in captions automatically as you’re speaking them. And then of course, if it makes a mistake, you can go back and correct that. But students can now make their own caption videos, if they have an Apple phone or an Apple device. I wish so much that there that we had this for Android because the app is so good. So well done. And I’ve made several videos and my students have as well. But the fact that the you know, people always ask me, how did you get the subtitles in there? It should take a long time typing, I was like, no, it just automatically reads your what you’re saying. And then you go back and correct what you need to and, and boom, there it is.

Brent Warner
Zero time typing. Yeah. I feel like there is a an Android. Maybe not made by by Android. So the nice thing about that one is made by Apple, right. So it’s built right in. It’s easy to do. I thought there was an android version. But anyways, if anyone knows, please come back and drop a link in the in the show notes. And we’ll we’ll be happy to add it in there as well.

Ixchell Reyes
All right, it is time for our fun finds. And this time around, I have cosmetic now that things are starting to open up. It makes sense that you’d want to put your makeup back on or try things.

Brent Warner
Oh, should I be taking screenshots of you and posting them so yeah, I’m

Ixchell Reyes
actually wearing this. This is a Lime Crime. plushie matte lipstick.

Brent Warner
Wait a second line? line crime plushies I thought I thought this was gonna be a stuffed animal. Well, yes,

Ixchell Reyes
well, that’s because when you apply this on your lips, it’s really soft, like a plushie really like

Brent Warner
like brushing out plushie across here feels like

Ixchell Reyes
it does. It’s not sticky. It’s not oily, it’s just light and feathery. Those of us who wear lipstick will understand what that means. Okay. And it stays on your lips. So it’s a fairly inexpensive product. So if you want to go out there and try any other colors. Yeah, I like the fact that you don’t have to worry about leaving ellipse 16 somewhere or that it’s sticky on your lips. So why Crime plushies Matt?

Brent Warner
No, I’m going to point out that your lips right now are not green. So the name is other flavor, I’m assuming or is that a

Ixchell Reyes
lime Lime Crime is the brand.

Brent Warner
Oh, okay. You’re always like, you always get these things. I’m like, I have no idea what you’re talking about in this entire world here. Okay, so Lime Crime is a brand it’s not the flavor and it’s not the color

Ixchell Reyes
is the style of their their line. Okay,

Brent Warner
so much for me to learn. Alright, mine is for those of you who know me, you may know that I am a mystery science theater 3000 fan always have been. And what they’re doing right now is they are they have a Kickstarter campaign called make more MST 3k dot com. It’s pretty cool what they’re doing. So they if you’re a fan of the show, you know, it was like basic cable all the way up into the sci fi channel and Comedy Central. And then it was on Netflix and Netflix didn’t continue it. But what they’re trying to do is take the control back to them into the fans. And so the Kickstarter is kind of letting them create their own studio and their own app and website and portal and everything in order to kind of keep making the show. So it is only going if this once this episode comes out. It’s only going I think until May 6. And so if you are a mystery science theater fan, I don’t know it’s already cleared the bait the first level, but they’re trying to hit these different target goals. I don’t know if it’s going to get to the top target goal. It would be great if it did. But if you love Mystery Science Theater, kind of cheesy movies and jokes and all those types of things. There’s a Kickstarter out there right now which you can support so MakeMoreMST3K.com.

Ixchell Reyes
As always, thank you so much for listening to the show. You could win a one of a kind DIESOL pin by leaving us a review on Apple podcasts. And if you’re giving us a shout out any other way tag us on social media.

Brent Warner
We are still on Patreon so DIESOL.org/Patreon or patreon.com/DIESOL I think either way it works. Or is it DIESOLpod? I don’t remember. Yeah, if you want to support the show $1 $3 $6 those are the different choices and you know we hope you enjoy the show you whether or not you’re able to support it is totally okay but it is there if that’s something you feel compelled to chase down.

Ixchell Reyes
And we are continuing on clubhouse we have our 30 minute check in Mondays. So drop by if you’re able to either listen or participate This is at 5pm California time 7pm Central Time and 8pm eastern time and if you’re somewhere else in the world, if you see us pop in say hello

Brent Warner
Just jump on in and you can also access that at any time through DIESOL.org/clubhouse. So for the show notes and other episodes, please check out DIESOL.org/41 and of course you can listen to us voiceEd Canada. That’s voiced.ca You can find us on Twitter. The show is @DIESOLpod and I am at @BrentGWarner.

Ixchell Reyes
And I’m Ixy underscore Pixy that’s I x y underscore p i x y. In Vietnamese Thank you Is cam ON CAM on for tuning in to the DIESOL podcast.

Brent Warner
Thanks everybody. Have a good one.

In this episode we dive into the use of interactive video and the role of captions in language learning. What value is there in including videos in our teaching? How do interactive videos help content retention in learners? How do captions support literacy for language learners? Join us as we discuss these questions and talk through some tools to enhance your teaching!

Articles

  • The use of Videos as a Cognitive Stimulator and Instructional tool in Tertiary ESL Classrooms – Kaur, Yong, Zin, Dewitt (Malaysian Journal of Educational Technology)
  • The effect of problem-based video instruction on learner satisfaction, comprehension and retention in college courses – Hee Jun Choi and Scott D. Johnson (British Journal of Educational Technology)
  • Captioning to Support Literacy – (Reading Rockets- Alise Brann, 2011)
  • Captioning Gives Literacy a Boost By Monica Brady-Myerov — (Ed Week July 21, 2015)
  • Augmented Interactive Video: Enhancing Video Interactivity for the School Classroom – Kazanidis, Palaigeorgious, Papadopoulous and Tsinakos (Journal of Engineering, Science, & Technology Review)

Embedded Text Tools  (pre-made)

Embedding Text Tools (student-made)

Fun Finds

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